Mail Sack, Easter 2013.

A sample of the mail:

From Anthony Liberatore:

“Fantastic posting William. In a blessing of spending Easter with some friends in their home, the Dad Ted and I discussed are girls, their pursuits, and their futures. He mentioned their activities they engage in now and in the future especially if they are broad with give them perspective. This meeting with this humble gent and this article adds to my perspective and blessings. Well done Sir, My best to you and Grace on this Easter Day. Anthony”

From Sprint builder Joe Goldman:

“William have you read the book of editorials called “For two cents plain” This is about, and I forget the gentleman’s name, his writings in the Carolina Israelite. I think it was in the early sixties. You would find a kinship in the writings. Musings like why I never send back dinner when the waitress brings peas instead of the ordered string beans. See you on the 12th. Joe”

From builder Jackson Ordean:

No one ever flew higher than those on the wings of Love. You got it! Happy Easter, and Thanks! {;^)”

From builder Dan Branstrom:

“Thanks for your powerful words”

From Zenith 750 builder Blaine Schwartz:

“William, Your message is right on the point, as usual. We all have so many things to be thankful for. The very fact we can think about building and flying airplanes is evidence our daily lives have been blessed to the point that our cups runneth over. You mention those who can’t seem to find happiness; we should all view the cup as half full instead of half empty. Thank you for you thought-provoking expression.”

From Builder Bruce Culver:

“You see, William, this is why I make it a point to read everything you write, whether it’s strictly about airplanes and engines or not. This is the sort of deeply meaningful philosophy we don’t get in most places in popular culture, but this kind but poor man exemplifies the best of the human condition. And you’re in good company: Rabbi Harold Kushner, perhaps best known for his book, “When Bad Things Happen to Good People”, is quoted, “I used to admire people who are intelligent; now I admire people who are kind.” Intelligence is a gift; kindness is a virtue. The gift is nice, but the virtue is priceless. And for the record, that watchman may not have much in material things, but he is far richer than most in spirit. He does indeed have much to be thankful for…..”

New Numbering System, Final, please print.

Builders,

Grace and I have both work many long hours in the last few days to get all of the new numbering system up in its final form in one spot. We have integrated it into our regular parts sheet on Flycorvair.com. You can find it by clicking on this  direct link:

http://www.flycorvair.com/products.html

This has now replaced our traditional products page. The numbers list is 16 pages long with the introduction. It is my official road map on how to build a Corvair flight engine. Having the list integrated into the parts page allows builders making progress to look ahead a plan their next move. From here, when I write about engines we build, or ones that I think would be good for a Zenith 750, a Piet or a KR, I am going to heavily use the Group Numbering system to describe these engines. When I am writing about the parts a builder must have to assemble his case at the college, I am going to describe the needed items in terms of the groups. This list serves far more educational roles than you may first guess. I intend that it will become the backbone of the descriptive language that we use to communicate about ideas, parts and plans in the Corvair movement.

The new products page works, anything you wish to buy off it can be purchased directly through the built-in pay pal system. The only element of it that we are still working on is getting the updated photos and instruction sheets loaded. The Flycorvair.com site is hand written in a very old HTML language, and working with it is like transcribing the Dead Sea Scrolls into Swahili. It takes a lot of time. This .Net site is not written in code, it is updated with no effort by comparison

I ask that everyone tune up their printer and run off a copy, preferably in color. Take some time and map out your own build on it. As an incentive to builders heading to CC#25 or Sun N fun, If you show up with one of these in your hand, I will take $5 off anything you buy. If two guys walk into my booth at SnF and ask about engines, everyone should understand that I am going to be polite to the guy who wants to tell me about the 4 cylinder Corvair he had in high school, I am going to answer all the questions of the guy who has seen my website, but didn’t look enough to even hear about the number system, but I am going to invest as much of my time as possible with anyone who shows up with a printed numbers list, a highlighter, a pencil and a working knowledge of how we describe the engine now. There is only one of me, and there will be many people at Sun n Fun as interested spectators. That’s good, but my mission is to teach builders, not entertain spectators. I am glad to talk to the later and do a little hangar flying if they are standing there, but mission #1 is to communicate with builders, and nothing says you’re a builder like having a written plan in your hand. -ww

 

A thought on Easter….

Builders,

Two days ago I had to run up to an old school machine shop that we use in the heart of industrial Jacksonville. The place has been there for 50 years, and in that time the neighborhood has gone to hell, but the family has stayed. Many people who live in gated communities with strict property owners associations think a long lawn or a car parked outside means things are bad. I am speaking of really bad here, burned out cars sitting on the street, several people per block who are either on powerful drugs, mentally ill or both, and  endless boarded up houses with squatters living in them.  When NYC was the murder capital of North America in the 1970s, my teenage friends and I thought it was a great playground; In the early 1980s when Newark was still burned out from the ’67 riots we used to hang out there for the illegal street racing. In the same years I worked in East Orange, a city that barely remained functional. I know what bad looks like, and this is the setting on Beaver Street in Jacksonville.

Yet when you get to the machine shop, everything is different. It does have an 8′ chain link fence topped with razor ribbon and all the windows have long since been bricked up, but the lot actually has trimmed grass and an orderly look about it. Going inside gives the feeling of being inside a very industrialized cave. When you walk back outside you get the same feeling of leaving a movie theater and walking outside, not expecting to find a sunny afternoon.

In the parking lot with a rake or a broom is a thin, quiet man in his 50s. He is polite, and always offers to help carry your parts and tells you that locking your truck isn’t needed, he will keep an eye on it. You will never find a man like this at an ISO-9001 compliant company or a corporate facility, his existence here is solely due to the kindness of the family run business.

Given a minute this man will carefully explain that the shop owner has entrusted him with the job of watchman, and provided him with a small motor home, feeds him lunch (and has him take as much as he needs for dinner) and buys him a pack of cigarettes every other day. He also can take all the scrap metal to the recycler next door and keep the money. This man is too healthy to be a drinker or a drug person. He has a very kind way about him. I am embarrassed to say this, but first I thought he was mentally handicapped, but after a minute I realized that he is just polite and a good listener, and has been freed of the illusion of self-importance that infects almost everyone you met this week.

Leaving the shop on Thursday, I was in a big hurry to beat the traffic and get back to our CC#25 prep work. I had 10 things on my mind, and I was behind schedule on the day. Walking back to my truck the man approached me to say something. My first thought was I really don’t have time to speak with him today, but I find it very difficult to be short with someone so kind. He wanted to speak with me because he had seen our dog Scoob E when we had driven down here before. He asked if I had a minute to see something.

He walked me around to the far side of the building where there was a little pen made of scrap metal. In it were two small white dogs. They were overjoyed to see him. In a city where everything is filthy, they were very clean. They had shade, water and food. He wanted to show me his dogs. In the presence of this simple man, my day kind of seemed a giant self-made exercise in stress. Walking around the building I had thought “I can spend a few minutes to be kind to this person.” As I sat down on a milk crate, I realized that this is the exact same thought that this man has with every single person, every day. The distinction being, in my case I thought I was doing some charity, and in his he is living as a genuine human being.

I sat there for 15 minutes while this man told me of growing up in Tullahoma, Tenn. He told me about how the shop owner took him in and found a place for him. He spoke of how he found the dogs in a cardboard box. It was sunny out, but we are still sitting in a scrapyard in an inner city with sirens and smells, noise, trash and barbed wire around us.  During these few minutes, this man used the phrase “I am really thankful for..” at least 10 times. Every time he said it, he looked me right in the eyes. He really wanted me to know that he meant it.

As he spoke and petted the dogs, I thought that it was ironic that in a week I would be standing at Sun ‘N Fun for my 25th consecutive year. I will meet many friends there old and new. But with them will come the third of the people at the show, the ones who are just a single sentence away from telling you how terrible life is these days. The people who tell you that life in America is ending, flying is going to become illegal, everything costs too much, the government this and the government that. They will have this litany of complaints on the sunniest days at the best airshows in really good company. Although they live in the greatest place, enjoy tremendous freedom, have very small threat to their existence, 1/3 of the people at Sun ‘N Fun will have a reason to blame someone else for their unwillingness to pursue their own happiness.

The poorest of these people will have ten thousand times more money than the man in Jacksonville. The thinnest of them will have never have gone three days without food. The one with the most modest camper will have a better place to stay in the campground than the man in Jacksonville has to live in every day. Any one of the people who will complain have an infinitely more comfortable life, but not a better one. Everything the complainers have is poisoned because they are thankful for none of it.

Every single person who is reading this in America has the infinite good luck, totally unearned, to be born here instead of in the 50% of the world that lives under a police state. Things are not perfect, but there is outstanding opportunity for those who will take it. It is utterly ridiculous to have the most blessed of people stand at a great setting like an airshow and have them spend their hours their complaining that they just can’t do anything to pursue happiness anymore.

I am not suggesting that we should all be happy with the way things are. There are many things today that no one should be complacent about. A friend recently said “cynicism allows complacency but knowledge demands action.” I really believe this, but first and foremost, I have a long list of things I am thankful for, and one of them is having a man of humble circumstances but very large spirit decide that I was worth 15 minutes of his time. -ww

the mail:

From Anthony Liberatore:

“Fantastic posting William. In a blessing of spending Easter with some friends in their home, the Dad Ted and I discussed are girls, their pursuits, and their futures. He mentioned their activities they engage in now and in the future especially if they are broad with give them perspective. This meeting with this humble gent and this article adds to my perspective and blessings. Well done Sir, My best to you and Grace on this Easter Day. Anthony”

From Sprint builder Joe Goldman:

“William have you read the book of editorials called “For two cents plain” This is about, and I forget the gentleman’s name, his writings in the Carolina Israelite. I think it was in the early sixties. You would find a kinship in the writings. Musings like why I never send back dinner when the waitress brings peas instead of the ordered string beans. See you on the 12th. Joe”

From builder Jackson Ordean:

No one ever flew higher than those on the wings of Love. You got it! Happy Easter, and Thanks! {;^)”

From builder Dan Branstrom:

“Thanks for your powerful words”

From Zenith 750 builder Blaine Schwartz:

“William, Your message is right on the point, as usual. We all have so many things to be thankful for. The very fact we can think about building and flying airplanes is evidence our daily lives have been blessed to the point that our cups runneth over. You mention those who can’t seem to find happiness; we should all view the cup as half full instead of half empty. Thank you for you thought-provoking expression.”

From Builder Bruce Culver:

“You see, William, this is why I make it a point to read everything you write, whether it’s strictly about airplanes and engines or not. This is the sort of deeply meaningful philosophy we don’t get in most places in popular culture, but this kind but poor man exemplifies the best of the human condition. And you’re in good company: Rabbi Harold Kushner, perhaps best known for his book, “When Bad Things Happen to Good People”, is quoted, “I used to admire people who are intelligent; now I admire people who are kind.” Intelligence is a gift; kindness is a virtue. The gift is nice, but the virtue is priceless. And for the record, that watchman may not have much in material things, but he is far richer than most in spirit. He does indeed have much to be thankful for…..”

Builder Jon Ross writes:

“William, I fully agree with you. Having traveled the world I am constantly reminded of how lucky I am to have been born here in America. As I get older, I have taken notice of many things that in my younger years I was way too rushed to notice. Happiness comes in the most simplest of things; for me it is good time with friends, making a beautiful weld or some other type of craftmanship. I enjoy your observations as you wax philosophical; perhaps this is because I share many of the same observations as you do.”

KR2/Corvair builder/pilot Steve Makish writes:

“William, very good post. I also knew men like the person you vividly describe. I was in Detroit during the 1967 riots and last year at my Fathers funeral I saw nothing has taken place of the destruction of 1967. The old man I knew was in his eighties when I was a kid and he was the only one around with a chain saw and would cut our winter wood for us. He lived in a tar paper shack and drove an old Hudson “terraplane” He had many truisms but the one that sticks in my mind was “do you understand all you know about it?”  Warmest regards your friend,   Steve. “

Builder Allen Oliver writes:

“William: FYI: The book “For Two Cents Plain” that Joe Goldman referred to is by Harry Golden (1902-1981).
Good luck at SnF. Regards.”

   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Golden–  ww)

Piet builder Harold Bickford writes:

“Hi William, Printed out the numbering system list and added to the manual; that is the best way to say thanks to you and Grace for your work (aside from actually building up the engine).

The Easter comments were appreciated. There is so much to be thankful for rather than complaining about things often out of our direct control. I also think too many folks just don’t get involved in things bigger than they are so it becomes really easy to miss the people and opportunities that come our way daily. Off to the shop…..Harold”

Tim Gibbs, Kansas 750 Builder writes:

William, what an amazing story on your encounter with that man at the machine shop. As I read how you thought you could “spend a few minutes to be kind to this person”, I realized that people like this do us more good than we do them. This man truly understands the idea that problems and troubles are inevitable, but misery is optional. Thank you for sharing, I must admit I enjoy reading your insightful stories as much as I do reading about Corvairs! Have a safe trip.

 

Zenith 601XL builder/flyer Dr. Gary Ray writes:

“William, you and Grace are from a small part of humanity that I am lucky to know.”

Zenith 650 builder Becky Shipman writes:

“William,I very much like stories like this. The truly important people in my life always have time – although the people who are considered important generally don’t have time for anyone.

This story reminds me of a man I knew in my youth – “Uncle” Elwin. No relative, but he was everyone’s uncle. He started out farming (in Maine – not very lucrative). In the summers he ran a small group of cottages on the Maine coast by day, and was a maintenance man in the local sardine cannery by night. In the winters he and his wife took a trailer to Florida and picked fruit – a migrant worker from Maine. I knew him because my parents rented a cottage from him every summer of my life. On dump day, uncle would put the trash in the back of his ’47 Chevy pickup, put his two dogs in the cab, and several of us kids would jump in the back with the garbage. We’d go to the dump, and help him unload, and then he’d help us scrounge for material to make a go-kart or whatever. On the way back something would generally fall off the pickup – it was showing its age.

Sometimes people would just treat him like he was stupid. One day he was digging holes and putting birch trees in the ground that had been cut off the stump, and someone said to him “You know, those will never grow like that.” And Uncle rubbed his chin, looked at the tree, and then looked at the person, and said “Ayuh, you know I think you’re right”. And went on with putting them in the ground. They were there to support some kind of pea vine, but Uncle didn’t feel the need to bother pointing that out.

People would come by while he was in the kitchen, cat in his lap, dogs at his feet, smoking a pipe in his rocker, and they’d tell him the water didn’t work in their cottage. ”Ayuh” was all he’d say. The person would go away frustrated, and uncle would sit and rock, and about half an hour later he’d get up, and go fix it. He wouldn’t go fix it until he figured out what was wrong, but lots of people felt he was just lazy.

Maine grows blueberries, and they are picked by migrant workers during the summer, who lived in tar paper shacks in the blueberry barrens. In his later years, Uncle had some land on a river near there, and when he drove through he would leave some food from his garden at the shacks. When he passed away, he willed his land to the local native american tribe “It was theirs to start with”.

Anyway, your story reminded me of Uncle Elwin, and a number of really important people I met during my life who were never in Who’s Who. Thanks for reminding me about what’s important. Becky”

Sun N Fun 2013, Getting close

Builders,

Grace and I have decided to return to Sun n Fun again this year. This will be my 25th consecutive year at the event. We will have a full commercial display, in booth N-66, which is on the row in front of building “C”, the third of the four main display buildings. This is one row over from where we were last year. Sun n Fun is the second largest air show in the US, and it has been held every spring in Lakeland Florida for many decades. It is a big event, and it draws thousands of planes.

Dan and Rachel Weseman have an adjoining commercial display space, so we will have a place for all the Corvair builders to congregate. Just as  at Sun n Fun and Oshkosh last year, we are going to have a Corvair Cookout for all builders and fans of the Tonawanda master piece. There is a link  to a RSVP/sign up sheet on ther site, it is about one paragraph down at this link: http://flypanther.net/

There will be a one day gap between Corvair College #25, held April 5-7th in Leesburg Florida (more info later this week) and the start of Sun n Fun. We expect to see many builders at both events. We will do all the regular stuff, parking lot tours to look at builders cores, have every catalog part on display, have short blocks for sale, etc. If you are going to attend the event and have a specific question or would like to pick up something special, just drop us an email or call.

Above, Sun n Fun 2012. old friends left, Roy Shannon, and center, Steve Bacom Jr., both VariEze builders. On the right is Arnold Holmes, long time Corvair pilot and host of Corvair College #17. Arnold is president of EAA chapter 534, the local hosts of Corvair College #25. If you would like to see some of the events from last years sun n fun, get a look at this link: Sun N Fun 2012

For more info on Sn n Fun : http://www.sun-n-fun.org/FlyIn.aspx

 

Happy Birthday Sterling.

Builders’

If he were alive, Sterling Hayden would have been 96 today. He has been gone for 26 years, but even from the grave he is probably more alive than most men walking around upright.

Hayden-Asphalt.jpg

Sterling Hayden in 1950. He didn’t just look tough, he was. In WWII when other actors defended civilization by making comedies and VD training films, Hayden was an OSS agent fighting with the Joseph Tito and the Partisans in Yugoslavia.

If you are just getting home from work, and spent too much of the day surrounded by spirit-robbing people and things, take a moment to refresh your mindset by reading a little about Sterling Hayden at this link:

Sterling Hayden – Philosophy

Then head out to your shop and put in a few hours of work with your own hands that will set you apart from the  “preposterous gadgetry, playthings that divert our attention for the sheer idiocy of the charade.” Pick up a hand tool and get a hold of your life, do something to make this day count.-ww

Three Pietenpol Motor Mounts

( If the picture is small, hit F5 at the top of your keyboard.)

Builders,

As we are getting ready for CC#25 and Sun n Fun, we are building up some popular inventory for people to pick up in person. We have been welding for several days straight, and we have built 7 motor mounts. The three below are on  their way with the rest to the powder coater in the morning.

587892

Above, three Piet mounts. On the right is Terry Hand’s very original steel tube Pietenpol fuselage, built to Flying and Glider manual drawings. We made the custom mount on it to match the dimensions that are a quarter of an inch narrower than a standard wood fuselage mount. The two on the ground are for wood fuselages, one for Dave Aldrich and the other for a work shop ‘to be determined’.  All of these mounts are what I call a ‘High Thrust Line” mount. You can read the story behind them at this link:

Pietenpol Products, Motor mounts, Gear and Instalation Components. ( If the pictures are small when you get there, hit F5 at the top of your keyboard.)

If you are headed to the College or Sun n Fun and there is a particular piece that you would like to pick up, or even just see in person, drop us an email or call. We have lots of things in the hangar that we don’t always load up like full KR-2/2S cowls. We are glad to bring them if we know a builder is interested. Many of these things like mounts and full cowls are expensive to ship, and we are always ready to save the builder this expense. -ww

Corvair College #25 registration link now open

Builders:

Below is the direct link to the College #25 registration page. While it is not required, having people sign up really helps with fine tuning the event logistics. Please take the time to register if you are planning on attending. If you are thinking about heading in, but are not quite sure you can make it, I suggest registering anyway. It is better for us to overestimate the attendance in planning.

https://corvaircollege.wufoo.com/forms/corvair-college-registration/

As always, a big thank you goes out to 601XL builder Ken Pavlou for setting up the online registration again.  Ken and I are pictured below at CC#14, for which Ken was the chief organizer. Ken has done a lot for us, all the way down to setting up this blog/Web page.

 

Above, I introduce our local host Ken Pavlou at Corvair College #14. Online he likes to be called “The Central Scrutinizer,” a character who is an omniscient narrator in the Zappa opera “Joe’s Garage.” Outside of the Corvair movement, Ken has a long list of accomplishments: Emigrating from Greece at age 8, he has gone on to earn an electrical engineering degree, become a registered nurse and skilled pilot. Happily married and the father of two, he’s also the State Ballroom Dancing Champion of Connecticut (no kidding), and he could earn a living doing stand up comedy. Not bad for a guy who’s barely in his 40s.

Kitplanes Clarification

Builders:

Kitplanes magazine covered alternative engines in an article that was released a few days ago. Dan and Rachel Weseman asked that I clarify a misunderstanding from the article. As it appears, some people thought I was implying that I had developed all the things I mentioned. My intention was only to highlight developments in the Corvair movement in general. Although anyone reading my Web site knows the following, I will just say it here plainly:

I had nothing to do with the development of the Weseman billet crankshaft. Dan and Rachel have kept the manufacturer’s ID private, and I do not even know who they are.

I had nothing to do with the design nor development of the Panther either.

I have assembled engines with the billet crank, and can attest they are great pieces. I helped Dan with some small tasks on the Panther, but nothing more than anyone would do for a friend building a plane, nothing he couldn’t have done himself. Really, my sole contribution in either of the above was to say positive things about the work of friends.

Dan also pointed out that I have a long history of illustrating out how LLCs are used by bad people in our industry to evade responsiblity. He thought it would be fair if I pointed out that LLCs also serve the function of protecting good people from frivolous legal action. Dan and Rachel have their work under a LLC, and would like people to hear about the positive side, that many good, successful firms in our industry are organized this way. My goal was not to demonize LLCs, but to get builders to develop their own “buyer beware” attitude. In the end, smart people already knew this, and bargain hunters who didn’t care who they dealt with were not swayed by anything I wrote, so the writing probably had little or no effect anyway.

To avoid future misunderstandings of this sort,  builders should just get their information directly from Dan and Rachel. It is their hard work, and it’s obviously best explained by them. I am still a big fan, it’s great stuff, but we can just read about it on their own site, http://flypanther.net/ 

-ww

Group Sources for the new numbering system.

Builders,

Below I have stripped down the new numbering system to just the group headings. Now it is forming something of a check list for a builder. Without the details drawing your attention, you can get a bigger picture of the build as a path.

In this segment I want to show builders where the primary sources are for people finishing most engines today. Again, this isn’t a detailed shopping list right now, It is just a big picture overview of the best route to success now days.

If the task of building still looks long even with all the details removed, first note this: Groups 3400 through 4300 are in this color brown. They are best understood as the airframe installation part of the engine build. If your goal is to get an engine running on the stand at a college, you will not need any of the parts from these groups yet. So lets stay focused on the groups through 3300. 

Next, understand that you will not need to use all 34 of the other groups to have a running engine, There are 3 different 5th bearing choices listed, Dan’s is 3000 in blue, Roy’s is 3100 in green, and mine is 3200 in black. There are other choices on oil systems, charging systems, and other parts that mean a running engine is built out of roughly 28 groups.

Every group that most builders today get from Dan is coded in blue. Looking at Group 1000, it is blue because Dan is now processing the majority of cranks going into engines, and supplying a flow of new billet ones. He isn’t the only place, Moldex is still doing cranks, but I want this list to focus on what is popular now, not every possible path. Shortly, Rachel is going to have the same numbering system on their website as we use here to make processing easier to follow.

Parts from Roy are coded green and those from Mark at Falcon are coded red here. I left everything else in black. A little later I will introduce our own detailed parts list with new numbers, but for now, the majority of the remaining items in black are from us or through basic sources like Clarks.

While getting this overview, feel free to go back and look at the 20 parts I wrote in the last 60 days under the heading “Getting Started in 2013.” They provide an in-depth look at builder choices for the Groups 1000-1600. This is what the new numbering system is about; having the ability to have a good overview of the process by looking at the checklist below, then getting a more detailed look at each step and the required parts by studying the full list presented in the two previous parts, and finally, having each component numbered so that you can read and understand anything I share about my experience on that exact part, without loosing your place on where that specific part will be serving in your own engine build.

In the next segment, I am going to build up some typical engines and show exactly which groups they draw on, and in which order you work them to get to the finish line of a running engine this season.

.

(1000) Crank group

.

(1100) Cam group

.

(1200) Case group

.

(1300) Piston and rod group

.

(1400) Cylinder group

.

(1500) Head group

.

(1600) Valve train group

.

(1700) Head clamping hardware

.

(1800) Steel engine cooling baffles

.

(1900) Valve Cover Group

.

(2000) Rear oil case group

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(2100) Oil pump and regulator group

.

(2200) Oil Pan Group

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(2300) Front cover group

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(2400) Starter group

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(2500) Hub group

.

(2600) Top oil group

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(2700) Oil cooler group

NOTE: If you opt for group 2700, then delete group 2800.

 .

(2800) Heavy duty oil cooler group

NOTE: If you opt for group 2800, then delete group 2700.

 .

(2900) Standard charging system group

NOTE: If you opt for group 2900, then delete group 2950.

 .

(2950) Rear charging system group

NOTE: If you opt for group 2950, then delete group 2900.

 .

 (3000) Weseman 5th bearing group

NOTE: If you opt for group 3000, then delete the 2300 group. Contact FlyWithSPA.com for more information.

(3050) 5th bearing oil line group

 .

(3100) RoysGarage.com 5th bearing group

 NOTE: Typically, builders selecting this option will be fulfilling the following groups: 1000, 1100, 1200 and deleting 2300. Contact Roysgarage.com for detailed pricing.

 (3200) William Wynne 5th bearing group

NOTE: This bearing takes the place of groups 1000, 1100, 1200 and deletes 2300. Bearing system is not in production at this time.

 .

(3300) Ignition group

 .

(3400) Airframe ignition group

 .

(3500) Airframe charging group

 .

(3600) Intakes and carburetors

(3700) EFI Electronic fuel injection

Note: included only for later discussion.

.

(3800) Mechanical fuel injection

Note: included only for later discussion.

 .

(3900) Stainless exhaust systems

.

(4000) Propellers and spinners

(4100) Baffling and cowls

(4200) Motor mounts

 . 

(4300) Airframe fuel systems

 

 

Revised number system……Second half.

Builders:

Here is the second half of the revised numbering system:

I revised the 2600 group at 8:30 pm est 3/21 

I revised the 3300 group at 10:25 pm est 3/21

Starter group (2400)

2401- Starter

2402- Starter brackets w/hardware

2403- Tail bracket

2404- Fine gear

2405- Top cover

2406- Top cover gasket

2407- 5/16″ top cover hardware

2408- Ring gear

 

Hub group (2500)

2501(A)- Gold hub

2501(B)- Short gold hub

2501(C)- Black hub

2502- Hybrid studs and washers  -6-

2503- Safety shaft, nut, washer and cotter pin

 

Top oil group (2600)

2601 (S)-  Standard Gold Oil filter housing with 5/16″ hardware

2601 (R)- Reverse Gold Oil filter housing with 5/16″ hardware

2602- Oil filter housing gasket

. 

Oil cooler group (2700)

2701- Stock oil cooler

2702- Oil cooler mount

2703- Oil cooler mount gasket

2704- Oil cooler O-rings

2705- Oil cooler mount bolts 5/16″

2706- 3/8″ oil cooler mount bolt

2707- GM oil cooler side baffling

2708- Outboard oil cooler mount bolt

2709- Oil filter nipple (20mm)

2710- Oil filter

 

Heavy duty oil cooler group (2800)

2801- Heavy duty aircraft oil cooler

2802- Gold sandwich adapter

2803- NPT to -6 fittings -4-

2804- AN-6 hoses to cooler

2805- Cooler block off plate and hardware

2810- Oil filter (same part as 2710 filter)

NOTE: If you opt for group 2800, then delete group 2700.

 

Standard charging system group (2900)

2901- Front alternator bracket set

2902- Mounting hardware

2903- Permanent magnet alternator

2904- Altermator mounting hardware

2905- Drive belt

NOTE: If you opt for group 2900, then delete group 2950.

 

Rear charging system group (2950)

2951- Rear alternator bracket

2952- Mounting hardware

2953- Permanent magnet alternator

2954- Alternator mounting hardware

2955- Drive coupling

NOTE: If you opt for group 2950, then delete group 2900.

 

Weseman 5th bearing group (3000)

3001- Bearing kit (designed for short gold hub 2501B)

3002- Alteration to standard gold hub (2501A)

3003- Alteration to black hub (2501C)

NOTES: Selecting this bearing option allows deleting the 2300 group. Contact Dan Weseman directly at FlyWithSPA.com for more information.

 

5th bearing oil line group (3050)

3051(A) – Oil feed line & fittings, Standard oil filter housing

3051(B) – Oil feed line & fittings, Reverse oil filter housing

 

RoysGarage.com 5th bearing group (3100)

3100- Bearing system assembly, Alteration to  gold hub, oil feed line and  fittings and modified starter brackets, etc. NOTE: Typically, builders selecting this option will be fulfilling the following groups: 1000, 1100, 1200 and deleting 2300. Contact Roysgarage.com for detailed pricing.

 

William Wynne 5th bearing group (3200)

3200- Bearing assembly system and sub components

NOTE: This bearing takes the place of groups 1000, 1100, 1200 and deletes 2300. Bearing system is not in production at this time.

 

Ignition group (3300)

3301 (E/P)- Electronic/points distributor with gasket

3301 (E/P/X)- E/P Deluxe w/ connector, studs, and gasket

3301 (D-P)- Dual points distributor assembly with gasket

3302- Hold down clamp, spring and nut

3303- Secondary wire set

3304- Sparkplug set -6-

 

Airframe ignition group (3400)

3401- Ignition coils -2-

3402- Condensors  -1 or 2-

3403- HT switch unit (MSD)

3404- Coil to switch wires

3405- HT pass through

3406- Coil to pass through wire

3407- Pass through to distributor cap wire

3408- SPDT-DPDT switch

3409- Ignition fuse box

3410- Nason switch

3411- Tach pickup

 

Airframe charging group (3500)

3501- Voltage regulator

3502- PMOV

3503- Master solenoid

3504- Power bus/fuse box

3505- Main electrical pass through

3506- Battery

 

Intakes and carburetors (3600)

3601- Intake manifolds

3602(A)- Marvel MA3-SPA

3602(B)- Stromberg NAS-3

3602(C)- Ellison EFS-3A

3602(D)- Sonex AeroCarb  –  38mm

3602(E)- Zenith 268

3602(F)- Rotec #3

3602(G)- 1 barrel Carter downdraft

3602(H)- Reserved

3602(I)- Reserved

3603- Carb heat

3604- Air filters

3605- Throttle cables

3606- Primers

 

EFI Electronic fuel injection (3700)

3701- FlyCorvair/Falcon

3702- RoysGarage

3703- Johnson/Holley

 

Mechanical fuel injection (3800)

3801- Airflow performance

3802- Precision systems

 

Stainless exhaust systems (3900)

3901(A)- Zenith 601/650/750/705 system

3901(B)- Universal #1 – KR-2, 2S, etc.

3901(C)- Universal #2 – Piet, Kitfox, Wagabond, etc.

3901(D)- Universal #3 – Tailwind, etc.

3901(E)- Reserved

3901(F)- Reserved

3902- Mufflers

3903- Y-pipes

Notes on turbo/321 pipes

Notes on iron manifold systems

 

Propellers and spinners (4000)

4001- Vans 13″ spinner assembly

4002- Front spinner bulkhead for Warp Drive props

4003- Warp Drive props

4004- Warp Drive mounting hardware

4005- Wood prop crushplate

4006- Sensenich props

4007- Tennessee props

4008- Reserved

4009- Reserved

4010- Reserved

 

Baffling and cowls (4100)

4101- Baffle kits

4102- Universal nosebowl with round inlets

4103- Zenith cowling

4104- Eyebrow cooling

4105- Rubber baffling seal

 

Motor mounts (4200)

4201(A)- Zenith 601/650 mount, all models

4201(B)- Zenith 750/705 mount

4201(C)- Pietenpol mount, high thrust line

4201(D)- KR2/2S mount, conventional gear

4201(E)- KR2/2S mount, tricycle gear

4201(F)- Custom mounts

4202- Tray and spools

4203- Bushings

4204- Bolts, nuts, clips, tubes

Notes on weight and balance

Notes on Cleanex mount, Panther mount

 

Airframe fuel systems (4300)

4301- Firewall pass through

Notes on gascolators, valves, braided lines