Deal of the Day, simple MA3 carb. (Sold at 1 am, 9/1/13)

Builders:

Here is the next “Deal of the Day. It is an MA3 carb. Please note that it is not an MA3-SPA, the primary carb we use.  The difference is that the SPA model has an accelerator pump, which also does a good job as a primer. Additionally, this carb does not have in flight mixture control. Functionally, the carb below is much like a Stromberg NAS-3. The person who puts this on their plane is going to also install a primer. This isn’t a big deal, and virtually every plane that has a Stromberg or even an Ellison has a primer. Only the MA3-SPA gets away without using one. I am thinking the most likely home for this carb is a Pietenpol or other fairly simple type of plane, but it does have the ability to withstand fuel pressure, so it could be used on a low wing aircraft with fuel pumps. It is not restricted to gravity feed like a Stromberg.

Why not just use an SPA instead of this MA3? Simple: Cost. The Core value of a rebuildable MA3-SPA is $500 to $600. This carb, which I am pretty sure will run as is, and is certainly a great candidate for a simple tune up (the throttle bushings on it are in very good condition, this is the hardest part of a rebuild). We are selling this as is for $150.

588140

Above, carb is dusty but complete. It will bolt directly to our standard intake manifold.

588141

It has a short throttle arm, but this can be replaced with a longer one. This uses the older style arm which is worth a lot less than the new style one.

588142

This carb would be a vastly more reliable unit than any carb derived from a motorcycle unit, especially the Bing, which has the tendency to lean out, something you never want in an aircraft carb. Real aircraft carbs are designed to go rich under most adverse conditions, there by protecting the engine from detonation. At forums I often get questions from inexperienced builders who are interested in trying different carbs. I always respond by pointing out that carbs  working on aircraft have a  number of certain characteristics, like vibration resistance, rugged controls, the ability to hold adjustment, and auto rich operation at wide open throttle. I ask the new builders, “Do you think you are more likely to find these qualities in a carb adapted from something else, or do you think they will be found in an actual aircraft carb? “

I have been messing with motorcycles since 1976. I have worked on more brands of motorcycles than most people have ridden. Much of my riding was in competition, where we worked on carbs a lot. I have owned just about every brand of carb most people have ever heard of, including odd ones like Linkert, Del’orto, Lectron, S&S and Amal. Same goes with automotive carbs. All of these carbs have characteristics that make them good at their original task, which was not flying. If you want a carb to perform like an aircraft carb, get one purposed designed for the task, like an aircraft carb. Look at the photo above and note that it says “Aircraft” right on it, and it even has a prop cast into it, something you will never find on a motorcycle carb. If you would like this carb, just send us an email,

WilliamTCA@aol.com

I will cover the shipping in the USA. ww

About William Wynne
I have been continuously building, testing and flying Corvair engines since 1989. Information, parts and components that we developed and tested are now flying on several hundred Corvair powered aircraft. I earned a Bachelor of Science in Professional Aeronautics and an A&P license from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and have a proven 20 year track record of effectively teaching homebuilders how to create and fly their own Corvair powered planes. Much of this is chronicled at www.FlyCorvair.com and in more than 50 magazine articles.

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