Corvair College #37, more photos.

Builders:

Some more photos from Corvair College #37 in Chino California. This is our 17th year of Colleges, hundreds of people have attended them, learned a lot had fun and made friends. All types of people have found the Colleges the place they feel most at home in aviation. If you are yet to find your own place in aviation, Consider the Corvair movement, a place where the traditional EAA values of learn build and fly are still practiced at every event.

.

.

Above, Daniel Kelley, Buttercup builder from Ventura CA, strikes the “Captain Morgan pose” right after his engine started. It took only 4 seconds of cranking to bring this 3,000 cc Corvair to life for the very first time.

.

.

Randy Lewis flew in with his 2,700cc  Corvair powered Dragonfly. That is him standing by the cowl. Plane has been flying for a while, has about 100 hours on it and uses an Ellison EFS-3A carb.

.

.

Photographic evidence that builders who attend Colleges actually read installation instructions.

.

.

The very petite Kiku Williams hard at work on her 2,700 cc Corvair. Most of are stands and fixtures work for people between 5’6″ and 6’6″. No problem, Kiku just pulled up a step stool and went to work assembling the bottom end in  her hello kitty shirt. Engine is destined for her KR-2s.

.

.

1964 Corvair Greenbrier daily driver showed up on Sunday.

.

.

Edward Wang pulls the prop through with the oil system is primed on his 3,000 cc engine. It is destined for his Zenith 750 cruiser. He built the engine staring from a closed case in 2 days at the College. This was his first event.
.

-ww.

.

Video of rebuild and run of Corvair, from a 13 year old.

Builders:

Pietenpol builder Bill Reynolds wrote a story on our “Piet-Vair” discussion group, about the 3,000 cc Corvair he and his son Jack rebuilt and just test ran at our first “Corvair Finishing School”. Included with the note is a link to the 8 minute film that Jack made, documenting the process from start to finish. It is an impressive visual story, even before you consider that Jack is just 13 years old. 

.

Bill and Jack have attended three Corvair Colleges, and many people have gotten to know them. We have a great number of father/son teams building, and even at Grandfather/father/son team, but the Reynolds are still standouts.  They have an infectious sense of fun and positive attitude, but they also both really learned their chosen engine inside and out.

.

I have taken countless opportunities to explain to people why the Corvair is a completely different engine option, but perhaps this short film explains what is available from a Corvair that you will never find with a “buy it in a box” consumer product engine like a Rotax.  Look at the start of the video, from 2 years ago, and see that Jack is a very sharp kid, and at the end of the process, he is obviously a young man. That credit goes to his parents and to Jack, but I think about how, many years from now, Bill and Jack will be out flying in their Pietenpol, and the engine powering it will be a running testimony to the time they spent together on it……. and that my fellow builders, is something that can not be purchased in an imported ‘box motor’ with a tag that says “No user serviceable parts inside.”

.

——————————–

.

From Bill Reynolds:

.

“The satisfaction of being able to put together a great engine with my own hands cannot be overstated and to share this experience with my son Jack makes it all the better. I currently have 400,000 miles on my 7.3 liter F-250 but I know infinitely more about my 3 liter Corvair because we had to learn about and assemble every component ourselves.
With regard to the team of folks that helped make our success possible, let me say that working with William and Grace has been something other than the standard consumer experience. Many builders go into a build with William, possessing a point,click, buy and install mentality. If you are even marginally awake, you will soon enough figure out that is not the way this works. Unlike parts suppliers who will happily take your money then show you the door , William actually has expectations of the people he sells parts to, he expects you to learn something and do things right and this takes a little time and patience.”

.

———————————————

.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZ4nwUg9uwg

.

Above, the film Jack made of the complete rebuild and test run process. Bill  is the kind of guy who comfortable speaking plainly about things which are important to him.  We are the same age, and over a few Colleges we had a chance to speak about some of these things. On the phone the other night, I said even though I am not a parent myself, sometimes  I see someone with their child, and it gives me real pause to consider what I missed.  I said to Bill that seeing him work with his son at the Corvair Finishing School was one of these times.

.

————————————–

.

Bill is on our private Pietenpol discussion group:

Piet Vair discussion group update, notes on joining

.

See Bill and Jack at Barnwell College #35:

Corvair College #35 Barnwell builders video

.

Bill and Jack attended 3 Colleges, CC #31 and #35 at Barnwell, and #33 At Eustis FL:

Corvair College #33, Mid Florida at Eustis Airport, April 17-19, 2015

.

Barton, Charlie and Robert Reddit are our Grandfather/father/son team who built a 3,000 cc Corvair for their Zenith 750. The EAA made this video about Corvair College #27, and the centerpiece of the film is the Reddit’s experience. Watch for the part where Charlie explains that building the engine together was the best way he could think of for his son Robert to really understand how special his grandfather Barton really is. The Film closes with Barton’s observation on what makes a life meaningful:

New EAA video on Corvair College#27, Barnwell 2013.

.

-ww.

.

 

December Schedule Notes

Builders,

Today I am in New Jersey for my Fathers’ 90th birthday.  I will be returning to the shop in Florida the week after Christmas. While here, I answer some email, but stay primarily focused on family. To refresh your perspective on 2016 operations, get a look at this series of links:  Outlook 2016 – Reference page.

.

We had originally planned to open the sign up for the first three colleges of 2016 this week. However, most people are focused on family at this time of the year, and we have chosen to open the sign ups the second week of January instead. Review the links below, as the dates and locations for the colleges are firm:

Outlook 2016, College #36 and Western building tour

Outlook 2016, Corvair College #37 Chino CA, 4/22/16

Outlook 2016, Corvair College #38, Cloverdale CA, 5/6/16

.

—————————————–

.

blog061613a

Above, my father’s official USN photo circa 1975. Although he is a 1949 USNA graduate, and served as an officer in both Korea and Vietnam, Father was also an enlisted man in WWII. In the closing months of that war, Congress opened the Naval Academy academic applications to enlisted men in the fleet, and waived the age limits. This resulted in the class of ’49 being 92% former enlisted, giving them a different perspective on leadership that followed them through their service.

.

His service remains the centerpiece of his life’s work. Please take a minute to read: William Edward Wynne Sr. –  Father’s Day Notes; it is a story I wrote about father on his 84th birthday. If you have ever wondered why I am intolerant of police states without human rights like China, the story will be illuminating.

.

———————————————-

.

Over the years, I have written a number of stories about my father. It is my hope that everyone understands that I have shared these to explain my great respect and affection for my father, and have wished the stories might spark many thoughts and memories of all the men who made us who we are.

.

Dad would be the first person to say that he was no one special, he was just a man of his generation, doing his duty for his country, living in a manner he hoped would make his father proud. My Father, born this day in 1925, was the only son his father had, the recipient of all the hopes and expectations a man could have for his only son. In a quiet hour today, my father shared a story of how he has strived to live his life by a code his own father would understand and admire. My father was 35 years old when his father passed from this earth in 1960. As I listened to Dad speak of trying to keep the respect of a man who has been past for 55 years, I thought this might be the best explanation of the bond between fathers and their sons.

.

———————————-

.

Further reading: Thought for The Day – Have we squandered the great gift?

.

-ww.

.

William Wynne Sr. Turns 89 today

Builders,

Today, my Father, the real William Wynne turns 89. To our friends fortunate to still have their fathers present, I feel blessed as you must also. To our friends who’s fathers now live in their hearts, I hope the season brings time to reflect on the men who made us who we are. -ww.

.

—————————————-

.

blog061613a

Above, my father’s official USN photo circa 1975.  His service remains the centerpiece of his life’s work. Please take a minute to read: William Edward Wynne Sr. –  Father’s Day Notes; it is a story I wrote about father on his 84th birthday. If you have ever wondered why I am intolerant of police states without human rights like China, the story will be illuminating.

.

 Sun ‘N Fun 2006,  Here my father and I are in front of a Grumman F8F Bearcat, a serious piece of hardware from my father’s era of Naval aviation. My father entered the U.S. Navy in 1943 and is USNA Class of 1949. He served on active duty for 33 years.

.

Corvair College #9: From left above,  Bob Cooper , Brent Brown and my Father.  In talking with Bob, my father learned that he was a 1961 veteran of Operation White Star in Laos. Little known outside military circles, White Star is considered the prototype of all unconventional U.S. warfare. The Kennedy administration sent the cream of the crop of America’s most elite warriors there to meet the Pathet Lao communists on their own terms. When my family lived in Thailand 10 years later, my father did extensive work to support the royalist democratic government in Laos. He and Bob had traveled to many of the same places inside Laos. Our friend Brent, who spent most of his 22 1/2 year military career in Special Forces, is probably one of the few people of my age group who have an understanding of the significance of Bob’s actions in White Star.

.

Corvair College #14: Above, I introduce the real William Wynne, my father.  His career in the mechanical world spans being a Company Commander with ACB-ONE in Korea through Director of Advanced Technology for Raytheon. The single thread that ties all of my father’s experience together is an absolute allegiance to quality control. Seven and 1/2 years of my father’s 33 year U.S. Navy career were spent working directly under Admiral Hyman Rickover, The Father Of The Nuclear Navy. Rickover’s career spanned the impossibly long 1918-1982. Widely misunderstood as an all-powerful tyrant who was apparently immortal, my father states that Rickover is easily understood when viewed as the ultimate proponent of quality who was willing to accept nothing short of perfection to ensure the dominance of the U.S. Navy in the Cold War.

.

My Parents at the Naval Academy in 1949: The above photo is of my parents when they were first engaged. They have now been married for 64 years, and remain the light of each other’s lives.

.

—————————————-

.

For a more in depth look at my Father’s world, follow these links:

.

William E. Wynne Sr. turns 88 today.

Happy Father’s Day William E. Wynne Sr.

 

 

 

 

Patriotism has no Party

.

I spent today in New Jersey, beside the hospital bed of my 90 year old father. In the afternoon, a kindly young nurse came in and asked a standard battery of questions, which ended with “would you say you are happy? Do you have bad dreams?” My father softly smiles and says “No, I’m fine.”  Although my father is a scrupulously honest man, he is not telling the truth here: In the past hours he has awoken a number of times, startled to find himself in a room he doesn’t recognize, when a moment before he was in a war, far away, in both geography and time.

.

The dreams are rooted in memories, unwanted souvenirs that followed him home from three wars and 33 years on active duty.  It is a near endless macabre library of images awaiting his eyes to close: An old woman pointing out a booby trap in the iron triangle; an F-8F ramp striking the USS Randolph, leaving only a floating tire; Severed heads from highway 1 south of Da Nang; A friendly fire accident by the USS North Carolina; A drunken sailor, drowned himself off Inchon; 23 classmates dying in a single day; A radio call from a Special Forces camp being over run; A friend handing him goodbye letters, explaining his number was up; a Huey floor slippery with blood; Having approved the pass for a man aboard the USS Thresher; His brother, Chief Ryan appearing Christmas week and saying his ship, the USS Vincennes, had gone to the bottom with 322 shipmates; His own father crying hearing the news my father was returning to Korea; A young officer, who survived the same tour, returning home, arrives in the middle of the night at Wake island, decides to dive into the pool to cool off, but it had been emptied. He dies in route to Pearl Harbor; a woman, unaware she is already a widow, awaits in Coronado expecting a happy reunion. It is endless, and these are the ones he can speak of. There are countless others for which words can not be found.

.

Father never spoke of these things until he was past 70. Slowly over time his skin thinned, and he slowly became porous, and leaked these images. Today, as an aging survivor, an eye witness to a particularly violent century, he feels obligated to remember the departed, but the memories bring him no more peace than his silence did. We listen, but we were not there, and if you were not there, his words will bring you little closer to the images in his mind. He is surrounded by family, but in coping with these images, he is alone.

.

Most Americans of a certain age can recall some of President Kennedy’s 1961 inaugural speech: “Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty.” These were not mere words to men of my Father’s profession, it was a cause to pledge your very life to. My Father did not care if the poor of the world chose collective farming or workers wanted social reforms. He just recognized that political systems that don’t value individuals always degenerate to Gestapos, concentration camps, gulags and mass graves. My Father fought to stop the spread of these things. He did not fight for glory, national honor nor American business interests. It was only about human beings.

.

When I was little, maybe 9, my Father took us to The Jefferson Memorial. There he explained to us that The United States of America was neither a business nor a playground, it is a set of ideals, which made it the last best hope of mankind. The dream that mankind had moved past kings and dictators, past theocrats and oppressors, to a world where individuals governed themselves as equals. We could look at the ceiling and read Jefferson’s words plainly:

.

“I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.”

.

 From there we went to Arlington, where my father explained that the nation had set aside an eternal resting place for the citizens who had laid down their lives for the ideals of this country, and if he were ever to take a place among them, we should not weep, as it would only mean that he had lived for something greater than himself.

.


.

The title of this story is simple: Although both parties in this country want to claim ownership of patriotism, their narcissistic candidates and zealot followers don’t own it nor have any right bestow it on anyone.  Like most career officers of his generation, my father never spoke of politics, and had no allegiance to any candidate. In the privacy of our home, he expressed his great admiration of FDR. Dad has been a life long vocal opponent of discrimination in any form, and he felt there was no need for any child in this country to be hungry. My fathers views on a just society would make him a traditional Liberal Democrat, but his views on personal integrity often leave him unable to support nominated candidates.

.

When I am enduring a lecture on the evils of FDR from a person born since 1945 who has never gone a even a few days without food, far less years with little hope, I suspect they would soften their zealot views if they had actually lived through the Great Depression as my father did. When I read forwards and stories claiming that no one with liberal social values supports this country, I think perhaps they wouldn’t send that to me if they understood they were slandering my Father; When an occasional tree hugging idiot assumes that he is entitled to address every old man in a veteran cap as a war monger, including my father, it makes me equally livid. Any reasonable person understands that patriotism has no party, and the country we live in, was provided for us by men of many perspectives, but in election years, our country seems woefully short of reasonable people, and overflowing with vocal zealots, all of who would benefit from some personal first hand experience with others they are so quick to condemn.

.

This is my issue, my Father is bothered by none of this. He is from a generation of men who’s love of country and family were strong enough to never need the acknowledgement of others, far less praise nor reward. They were motivated solely by belief and love.

.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

.

Above, a 17 year old enlisted man in WWII.  To understand why my grandfather, a WWI combat veteran objected, read this: A clarification and a century old story.

.

 Above, on the left, my Father stands in the rubble of downtown Seoul, Korea, in 1952. At the time, my Father was a company commander with ACB-ONE

.

img002

 .

Above, Father at the table (holding the papers) Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MAC-V) in Saigon, 1966.

.

.

The photo above was taken in early 1968,  In my 5-year-old hand, I hold the Bronze Star awarded to my father during his 1967 tour in Vietnam.

.

blog061613a

.

Above, my father’s official USN photo circa 1975.  His service remains the centerpiece of his life’s work. Please take a minute to read: William Edward Wynne Sr. –  Father’s Day Notes; it is a story I wrote about father on his 84th birthday.

.

………………………………………………………………………………………….

.

Below an excerpt from : Thought for The Day – Have we squandered the great gift?

.

“I have not watched TV at home in many, many years. But here, in the home of my parents, I sit beside by father, his mobility robbed by age, as he looks into the TV to find some evidence that we have not squandered the gift, a free world, which we received from the men of his generation, perhaps your father among them. It is a gift we didn’t earn, they purchased it for us anyway, at a staggering human cost.

.

Father is an eternal optimist, he only needs to find some trace of good that was built on the foundation we were bequeathed. But in an hour, there is nothing to hold on to, nothing to salvage from the endless waste of consumerism, at astronomic levels of narcissism, all acts of selfless heroic deeds pushed aside by a tide of greed and gluttony, bathed in comments from the most inane actors pretending to be journalists, offering no insight, only triggering knee-jerk emotional reactions to dog whistle phrases.

.

I do not look at the screen, I only see it reflected in my fathers glasses as sifts through news channels looking for some bit of rectitude hidden in the waste. When I can take no more, I put my hand on his, and impulsively say “I am sorry”. For a moment he looks in my eyes to assess if I really understand what the gift cost. At this moment I understand that every old story was told in the hopes that we might understand what was done for us, not so we would thank them, just so that we wouldn’t waste it. On this day, I remain profoundly sorry for how little we have done with the gift.”

-Ww

A very generous gift….601XL-B

Builders:

Here is a story that will tell you something about the quality of people we have in the Corvair movement. Just before Oshkosh, I was contacted by  builder Rick Koch, who had been working part time on a Zenith 601XL project for several years. The complete airframe was done, but Rick, a veteran aviator of many years experience, came to the conclusion that he was busy enough with work and family, that he wasn’t making it out to the airport often enough to finish the plane any time soon. He called with a very generous idea: If I knew the ‘right person’, someone I was confident had the motivation to finish the plane, Rick would give it to them.

.

After giving Rick some time to be sure of his decision, I told him I had his man: Tim Hanson. If you have not read this man’s name before, take a moment to read this story: 100 HP Corvair, Tim Hansen , Persistence Pays .

.

I knew that Tim was the right guy, because life had already tested him, and it had never diminished his determination to be an aviator. People can start a project or a process with many ‘assets’ in their bank. The can be smart, educated, have financial resources, etc. but until they are tested, it is just speculation on how they will respond to the road getting rough.

.

I have long said that Homebuilding is a continuous series of challenges. It is 1,000 chances to quit, that all come up when you are surrounded by people who tell you that everything you are doing is wrong and flying planes is foolish, building them is insane. To succeed, you must be the kind of person who shrugs this static off, and stays steady on the path. Tim Hansen is such a person.

.

If you are getting the idea that Rick Koch is some sort of aging, super wealthy philanthropist, let me correct that. He is a hard working successful professional, but he is not Howard Hughes nor Warren Buffet. He is a regular American middle class guy in his fifties. I particularly like the idea that Rick didn’t need nor want to know anything about who the recipient would be, other than they needed to be determined.  Rick has never met Tim, yet he was moved by Tim’s track record of persistence. To Rick’s perspective, all people are individuals, and to him it doesn’t matter what the claim, look like or where they come from, all that matters is how they act and the responsibility they take for those acts.

.

If Rick is notably ‘wealthy’, it is in this sense: He holds a particularly strong sense of the value of individuals, and exercising his will, to make an effective contribution of his choosing, brings him the ‘wealth’ of living with fidelity to his own personal code. And that, to a man of character, is particularly valuable.

.

-ww.

.

IMG_1795

.

Above, Tim Hansen, stands next to Grace in our hangar the night his engine ran. Because of a particularly generous donation, Tim will take this engine flying sooner than he thought. When I told him about the plane, Tim wrote this note:

“William,
I have tried to come up with the right words to express just how
incredible and generous this is, and as I have had no luck coming close, these
will have to do for now. I am humbled that someone who has never met me, thinks so much of what little I have done, that they would offer such an extraordinary gift sight unseen.  I would definitely like to meet Rick Koch, and thank him in person for giving me the chance to live up to the story you wrote, by writing the rest  of the story and finishing and flying the airplane. I appreciate all the efforts that you, Grace, and Phil Maxson have put forth on my behalf I and I doubt very much I will ever be able to repay it all, though that won’t stop me from trying.”

.

blog0114137959

Above, Rick running an engine outside my hangar several years ago. In discussing his gift, he mentioned that he has had countless hours of good times in aviation, from ultra lights to flying skydivers. Although he plans on returning to flying at some point, he chose to make his 601 project a ‘gift’ to a promising builder as an expression of how much flying has meant to him. Over the decades, Rick spent a ton of money in aviation…..but that was because he felt it was worth it. In the end, the money he could have gotten for the project would have hardly decreased his total spending in aviation, but conversely, making it a gift greatly increased what he personally got out of being an aviator.

.

Dale Williams – 3,000 cc Cleanex at CC#31

Builders:

If you are a regular reader of this page, you will recognize the name Dale Williams as the builder and pilot of a very nice 3,000 cc Cleanex.  Dale often writes very thought provoking and factual statements in the comments section of stories. He has a long GA background and an easy going approach, but he is serious about risk management and having a good time. I frequently hear from new builders in South Carolina who cite Dale as the influence that steered them to Corvairs.

.

An interesting trick: Although I can count the amount of hours I have spent with the man in conversation on one hand, and have read less than 4,000 words from him in posts and email, I still feel like I know him very well. In this instance, it is quality, not quantity that makes the difference.

.

CC#31 was the second Corvair College that Dale flew his plane to. We are looking forward to having him at many more. Good company is always welcome. -ww.

.

IMG_1740

Above, Dale stands in front of his Cleanex. Bob Lester’s Corvair-Piet in the Background

.

IMG_1739 Above a small sticker on the forward fuselage suggests Dale’s sense of humor.

.

IMG_1735

Above, right hand view of the plane. Don Harper and P.F. Becks Corvair-Piets in the background, Mark Langford’s VW powered KR2 is beside it.

.

———————————–

.

For more information on Dales plane, read:

New 3,000 cc Cleanex, Dale Williams, SC

and the very moving:

Video of Grandson’s first flight, 3,000cc Cleanex:

.

————————————–

 

A positive path, well planned, Zenith 650 in the works

Builders,

The letter below came in as a comment on the previous story on punctuation. I like it enough to break it out and give it it’s own place on the stage. It is a very good example of good planning. I have found that builders who careful approach decisions, and really consider them have a vastly better completion rate than people who make a snap decision or instant evaluation.

.

Over the years I have noted that many people who look at a Corvair for 2 minutes and claim it is brilliant and equally rapidly judge myself to be a flawless gentleman, will in a short time, over some minor bump in the road, rapidly decide that Corvairs are terrible and I am a dangerous moron. Some people fall in and out of their fairy tale romance quickly. The type of decision process outlined below always works out a lot better in the long run. Steady progress comes from a solid understanding of the strengths and advantages of an engine program and the honest evaluation of weather or not they fit ones needs.

,

the letter below, Earnie mentions heading to Corvair College #28 after a careful evaluation, and how he found his home in homebuilding among the builders there. This was the College we held in Texas last year. The two men he is speaking of are well known Corvair builders and pilots Guest Writer: Pietenpol builder/flyer Kevin Purtee and Zenith 601XL-3100cc Dr. Andy Elliott. Kevin was 1/2 of our host team, and Andy flew his 601 in from Arizona. For a look at the event itself, Corvair College #28, San Marcos, Texas.

.

Occasionally a new builder will hear of the many aviation professionals like Kevin and Andy we have in the Corvair movement, and tell me they are concerned about fitting in because they are new to homebuilding or aviation. I point out that if you are new, then by all means make sure you strongly consider becoming a Corvair guy, because it is critical for your own development and safety to spend your building months and years in the company of people who know what they are doing, take the task seriously, and work in the Corvair movements ethic of giving back to new arrivals. If you are new, take a moment to read: Concerned about your potential?

.

125117

 At Corvair College #28 Andy Elliott took a number of builders for their first flight in a Corvair powered plane, as weather permitted. This is fun, but it is also valid training. Understanding what a properly running engine sounds and feels like in the cockpit is important. An essential element of the Corvair movement is the willingness of the successful and the skilled to return to share this with the other builders.

.

To experience this first hand at Corvair College #32: Corvair College #32, 27 Feb. in TX, Filling up fast.

.

———————————————-

.

William,

A little over two years ago I decided that I was going to build a plane. I then started my search for which plane to build and after defining my mission and whittling away those that didn’t fit; I decided that the Zenith CH 650 B was the one.

In January of 2013 I ordered the plans and, for whatever reason at the time, my attention went to which engine to use. As I did my research it quickly became apparent, if I chose an “aircraft” engine, that easily half the whole cost of the aircraft would be spent firewall forward! Plus I would have to come up with the full engine price in a short time frame. As I am sure you know, this can cause quite a dark cloud to hang over the whole project. Not a deal breaker but quite a steep mountain to climb for someone who is not made of money.

During my research I had come across your website and began to frequent it more. I must admit that the initial draw for me was the idea of being able to have an engine at half the price of others and to be able to extend the cash outflow for it over and number of years.

By the time of Sun-N-Fun 2013 I had some knowledge of the Corvair engine but was still not committed to using it. I went to Sun-N-Fun 2013 with two main objectives, first to get a better look at the CH 650 B (having chosen it I still wanted to see it and sit in it) and second to look at engines.

I write all this to say that while at Sun-N-Fun I saw a lot of salesmen dressed nicely in their booths passing out their fliers. I saw you in your booth also, and with some observation picked you out as the proprietor of the establishment. I must admit, again, that your outward appearance, the long hair, blue jeans and tee shirt, was not the expected business presentation. I perused your displays but didn’t introduced myself.

I left Sun-N-Fun absolutely sure of my choice in the Zenith and on the verge of being committed to using the Corvair. Getting home I continued to read your website and began to be impressed by two main things that I found there. First (and foremost), I noticed that those who had converted a Corvair for aircraft use showed it can have (if done correctly) an excellent expectation of reliability. Second, some of the people who are using the Corvair in aircraft are aviation professionals with impressive credentials. Two of those, who you have mentioned yourself and I have met personally (CC #28), are Kevin Purtee (a military pilot, Chief Warrant Officer 4 and has flown combat missions in Iraq) and Andrew Elliot (an MIT graduate and holds a PhD in Aerospace Engineering). Surely if these have chosen the Corvair, with their experience and understanding of the need for a piece of equipment to be reliable and trustworthy, I should be able to use it for my plane also.
I am glad that I didn’t let any type of stereotypical first impressions stop me from pursuing and learning about what will become the power plant on the front of my airplane.

William, many in our society today don’t want to hear the truth. The truth doesn’t make them feel good about their bad choices or remove the responsibility for them. I have a saying that I tell others when they want to tell me something but don’t know how, “Tell me the truth. I can handle the truth, good or bad. What I can’t handle is someone lying to me.” So keep telling the truth, you have someone who appreciates it and is learning from it!

Earnie Fontenot

.

Back from Corvair College #31,Barnwell, S.C.

Builders,

We have returned from CC#31 in Barnwell, our 5th event with local hosts P.F. Beck and his outstanding team of volunteers. It was a great event, with many planes flown in, many engine built and run, much learned and many friendships, both new and old, strengthened.

.

At dinner on Saturday night the head count was 107 people, the largest number of builders in several years. There were a number of builders and pilots like Mark Langford, Joe Horton and Dale Williams who were on hand Friday and Saturday, but flew out before the dinner. All totaled we had about 115 individuals at the College.

.

Over the next several days Grace and I are unpacking and getting parts in the mail to builders. Our main CNC machine shop finished a large batch of Gold Prop hubs and Gold oil systems at 5 pm Thursday, a week later than scheduled. We departed later that night without a chance to mail them. Today they are going out by USPS priority mail.

.

Once we get these things covered, I will write up several photo essays from the college over the next week. For now, a single photo to start with, and a reminder that the sign up for College #32, just 108 days away, is already open: Corvair College #32, Texas Feb, 2015, Sign up open

.

 

IMG_8733

.

Above, Bob Lester’s Corvair powered Pietenpol sits on the ramp at Barnwell at sunset on Saturday night. Bob had flown it up from Florida that morning. It is the second college the plane has been to, Bob also flew into CC#25 in Leesburg. Bob has been flying for 30 years or so, and has owned certified aircraft from a Taylorcraft to a Stinson 108 and experimentals from KRs to his Pietenpol.

.

The son of a WWII combat pilot and a native of South Florida, today Bob lives in North Central Florida at a quiet rural airport. His batchlor’s paradise is a large hangar housing his apartment, his tools, motorcycle, the Stinson and the Pietenpol. Read more at these links: Pietenpol Power: 100 hp Corvair vs 65 hp Lycoming and New die spring landing gear on a Pietenpol, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Corvair College History….in photos

Builders,

Below are links to photo pages on all of the colleges we have held since #1 in the spring of 2000. This page is a work in progress, Because I still want to dig out some photos from the early events, San Antonio and the Canadian Corvair College in 2005, and put in pictures from #26 and #27.  Looking at the photos, it is a lot of engine building and learning, all mixed in with a lot of fun and friends. At the bottom we have a list of the 2014 colleges.

Although I am the only person who has made it to every college, we have a number of builders who have been at 6, and even a handful who have made it to 10 or more.  We have more than 25 people who’s first run happened on the stand at a college, who later flew the engine back in their plane. I look forward to reading comments from builders who have attended these events, it is a lot of good memories that I treasure.

————————

Above, Tom Cummings of LA, on the left, stands with me in front of my Pietenpol at CC#1. The event was in May of 2000. Tom was the very first guy to show up at the very first College. Read the last page on the CC#17 link for a full story on Tom.

———————

Click on any color link to see the photos and read the story

.

College#,  Location,  Local Host.

CC#1 – Spruce Creek FL  – William and Grace

CC#2 – Spruce Creek FL – William and Grace

CC#3 – Spruce Creek FL – William and Grace

CCJr – San Antonio TX – Oscar Zuniga

CC#4 – Sun N Fun, Lakeland FL – (2004)

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc4.html

CC#5 – Hanford CA – Pat Panzera

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc5.html

CC#6 – Edgewater FL – William and Grace

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc86.html

CC#6.5 – Edgewater FL – William and Grace

CC#7 – Alliance OH – Forest Barber

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc7.html

CC#8 – Edgewater FL – William and Grace

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc8.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc82.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc83.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc84.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc85.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc86.html

CC#9 – Edgewater FL – William and Grace

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc9a.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc9b.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc9c.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc9d.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc9e.html

CC#10 – Edgewater FL – William and Grace

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc10a.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc10b.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc10c.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc10d.html

Corvair College Canada

http://www.flycorvair.com/cccanada.html

CC#11 – Santa Rosa CA – Michael Henitz -QSP

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc11.html

CC#12 – White Plains SC – Ed and Val Fisher

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc12.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc12a.html

CC#13 – Livermore CA – Rick Lindstrom

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc13.html

CC#14 – Lowell MA – Ken Pavlou

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc14a.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc14b.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc14c.html

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc14d.html

CC#15 – (Planned but not executed)

CC#16 – White Plains SC – Ed and Val Fisher

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc16.html

CC#17 – Orlando FL – Arnold Holmes

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc17.html

CC#18 – Livermore CA – Rick Lindstrom

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc18.html

CC#19 – Barnwell SC – P.F Beck and crew.

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc19.html

CC#20 – Hillsdale MI – Roy Szarafinski

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc20.html

CC#21 – Barnwell SC – P.F Beck and crew.

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc21.html

CC#22 – Georgetown TX – Kevin Purtee/Shelley Tomino

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc22.html

CC#23 – Palatka FL- Weseman’s and Wynnes

http://www.flycorvair.com/cc23.html

CC#24 – Barnwell SC – P.F Beck and crew.

Corvair College #24, reviewed in photos, part one.

Corvair College #24, reviewed in photos, part two.

Corvair College #24, reviewed in pictures, part three.

CC#25 – Leesburg FL – Arnold Holmes

Corvair College #25, In Photos

CC#26 – Mexico MO – Zenith Aircraft Co.

CC#27 – Barnwell SC – P.F Beck and crew.

.

2014 Corvair Colleges

CC#28 – Austin TX – Kevin Purtee/Shelley Tomino, Feb.

Corvair College #28 registration is open

CC#29 – Leesburg FL – Arnold Holmes, end of March

CC#30 – Mexico MO – Zenith Aircraft Co., Sept.

CC#31 – Barnwell SC – P.F Beck and crew., Novemeber

:)