Distributor Clamp #3302 – video

Builders:

Today’s Video: https://youtu.be/JTLxBBtYQu0

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A decade in the making; Zenith 750 / Corvair, Gerry Scampoli

Builders

Below are pictures of Gerry Scampoli’s new Zenith 750 powered by a 2,700cc /100 HP Corvair, it is now flying off Gerry’s home airport on Cape Cod. I have long said the golden rule of home building is just two words: “Persistence Pays.”

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Its no secret the majority of homebuilt projects started are never finished. You need to get three major factors right to keep you out of that category, particularly if you are a first time builder. They are:

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You must pick an aircraft design or a kit that is long proven, fully developed, and supported by a company which is here for the long run. By any standard, All Zenith aircraft meet this definition. They are among the oldest and most reputable companies in experimental aviation,  a field which has seen countless weaker outfits fail and swallow peoples dreams with them.

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You must pick a power plant which is long proven to work on your particular airframe. The person who sells it to you must stay in business, and be willing to serve you. 2019 is my 30th year in the Corvair business. I have been working with Zenith builders this long: 15 Years of Corvair Powered Zeniths. You can’t get support from a company which no longer exists, and in experimental aviation, the life span of your average alternative engine company is roughly 2 years.

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You must be persistent in your building. It helps to do a little something every day, but persistence is more than a build schedule, it is an attitude.  A guy can have a very neat computerized spread sheet of scheduled build sessions, but I can make a much more accurate prediction of his completion based on his reaction to screwing up a part on his plane. If he gets on line looking for anyone to tell him “It will be alright”, my experience says he is going to have his project on barnstormers in a year or so, (and of course he will not mention the part he messed up) …. On the total other end of the spectrum is the builder who studies the mistake, understands the issue, and gets started making a replacement part. My bet is the persistent builder will finish his plane and have the kind of season Gerry is now having.

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Gerry’s 750 outside his hangar.

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Rear quarter view. Gerry focused his time and budget on mechanical stuff. You can always do an elaborate paint job later.  Unpainted planes are often 30-40 pounds lighter

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Flashback to 2010, Corvair College #17, Gerry savors the moment. His 2,700 cc Corvair lights up. Even if it takes you a decade to finish your plane, I will still be here.

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2010: Morbid humor at its finest: Gerry and I compare right arms above, both covered in skin grafts. He is the kind of guy you know you like the minute you meet him.

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Another view of the plane.

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Gerry’s plane has all our installation components. The only tweaking he is doing is a prop pitch adjustment on his ground adjustable Warp Drive.

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Good front view.

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Hats off to Gerry Scampoli on his completed and flying Zenith.

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Happy Flying,

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