Update notes to 2014 manual, 1200 – Crankcase group.

Builders,

If you are the owner of a 2014 conversion manual, below are some short notes on the 1200 – Crankcase group section. I have written about these details in the last 3 years, but they are presented here in summary form, please update your manuals and notebooks accordingly:

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2017 commentary: – This group is only slightly changed. Builders working on a 3.0L or 3.3L Corvair have always had to send their case to SPA to have it machined to fit the larger cylinders. In the last 3 years the Wesemans have also had to become experts in Corvair Head stud replacement options, as their “EIB” kit engines needed excellent head studs, and they also wanted to offer this to builders having their cases machined. If you are looking at a core case, and not looking forward to replacing some studs, call the Weseman’s at SPA, 904 626 7777, and they will be able to discuss the costs and options of head stud work.

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Above, thirty-six 1964-69 Corvair Cases pictured on the patio between our hangar and house. They have since been moved to the SPA/Panther factory. If you are building an engine and your core case has a serious issue, read this story: Corvair Case sale, 36 available, $100 each.

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1201-  Check to see the oil gallery plugs are reinstalled in the engine before assembly. We had at least two people forget this in 2016. You have to take a lot of the motor apart to fix this, and you will not see the mistake until the engine has no idle oil pressure on the run stand.

Do not over tighten the gallery plugs. they may have been very hard coming out, but the have a very low torque value, on the order of 10 to 15 foot pounds going back in. At least one guy a year cracks his case torqueing these like they were lug nuts on a dump truck.

Be advised that all replacement head studs need to be checked for strength before the rest of the motor is assembled. in 2015-2016, we has a rash of replacement head studs, made outside the US, that essentially had no heat treatment. They would never get to 25 foot pounds, the just kept stretching. If you have replacements in your engine read this: Testing Head Studs, note that it has been on my blog for 5-1/2 years.

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1202- For people who like new hardware, the Weseman’s have grade 9 case bolts and nuts available.

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1203- See 1202 above.

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Thank you. Wewjr.

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Update notes to 2014 manual, 1100 – Camshaft group

Builders,

If you are the owner of a 2014 conversion manual, below are some short notes on the 1100 – Camshaft group section. I have written about these details in the last 3 years, but they are presented here in summary form, please update your manuals and notebooks accordingly:

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2017 commentary:

In the last 3 years we have sold about 150 “1100-WW cam kits”, (Group 1100 cam kits on shelf.) they also went into every complete motor I built and into all of the Weseman’s “EIB” (engine in a box) kit engines. Buying one of these gets you every part from Group 1100, but it also makes sure your thrust washer on the cam is tight. In the last 3 years I have had 7 or 8 builders come to a college thinking that I was going to be OK with them assembling a motor with a wobbly thrust washer. They were not correct. Engines at Colleges and events I host,are assembled to my standards, because it is important to make things better, not good enough.

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http://shop.flycorvair.com/product/1100-cam-shaft-kit/ is the link to the products page.

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1101- an OT-10 is still a good cam, and it works, but our dyno testing in 2016 at a professional shop confirmed that our 1100 cam was a slight edge in an aircraft motor.

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1102- in 2014, I had some tolerance for thrust washers which rotated on cams. In the time since, I have concluded that since we know how to make them tight, and they undoubtedly left the factory tight, we should always make them so now. If they are tight, it precludes any conversation about “how loose is too loose?” which is exactly what I don’t like as an attitude about building engines.

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1103- no change

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1104- Clark’s standard gears are still acceptable for use, and their timing marks remain consistently accurate. Their “fail Safe” gears were once made in the US and were billets, but they are not made here now, and they are no longer from billet material. They still work, but I pushed about 10 off cams with loose washers in the last 3 years, and they don’t grab a cam much tighter than a stock replacement gear, and they are apparently made of the same material. My preferred cam gear is the California Corvairs US made billet gear.

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1105- Some HT-817s are now made in Mexico. I have seen no quality difference, but to stay with American products our 1100ww cam kits come with Summit Racing lifters, which are made in the US.

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1106- no change

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1107- no change

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Thank you, wewjr.

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Update notes to 2014 manual, 1000 – Crankshaft group

Builders,

If you are the owner of a 2014 conversion manual, below are some short notes on the 1000 – Crankshaft group section. I have written about these details in the last 3 years, but they are presented here in summary form, please update your manuals and notebooks accordingly:

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2017 Commentary:

Three most popular cranks used in engines are 8409 Gen II, the Billet standard stroke, and the billet long stroke. All of these are from the Wesemans at SPA. Very few people take a different route than this, at a typical Corvair College today, all but one or two engines will be built around one of these three cranks.  At our  finishing schools; (Corvair Finishing School #1, Video report.) Each engine is required to have one of these three crank arrangements, because the fast pace of the work does not allow for the additional time or inspection requirements of using a crank which has not passed through the Weseman’s inspection process before the event.

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1001A – The Wesemans are the only shop I use to process GM cranks. They have been doing them for many years now, and after installing dozens of them at Colleges and in production engines, I can flatly state that they have the best process on 8409 cranks. They are not the cheapest, just the best value.

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1001B – The billet cranks were just getting into high gear in 2014, today they have long since become a very popular proven park. Countless hours of  aerobatics  have been flown on them, and they are well proven, without a failure of any kind. They are still made in the USA, to the highest standards. The original 2.94″ stock stroke which went into dozens of 3,000 cc Corvairs has now been supplemented with the longer stroke billet crank that goes in the 3.3 Liter engines. Although this sounds new, it is proven and flying, and is a regular production part: 3.3 Liter Corvair, a Smooth Power House.

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1002- no change

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1003- no change

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1004- no change

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1005- no change

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1006- no change

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1007- no change

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1008- no change

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1009- no change

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1010- In the years since 2014, I have built run and inspected several dozen engines using the Clark’s in house brand main engine bearings. This have proven to be the functional equivalent of American name brand bearings.  I have used them in sizes std, .010 and .020. They work.

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1011- The commentary on Clark’s main bearings also applies to Clark’s rod bearings.

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Thank you ,

Wewjr.

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63 Days until Oshkosh 2017.

Builders:

We have slightly more than two months until Airventure 2017 (July 24 – July 30).  As always, our space will be #616, in the North Aircraft display area, across from the Zenith Aircraft display, right next to SPA/Panther.

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In the next 60 days, I have a number of stories of newly flying planes, parts, skills and events to share. I have taken the last month off from writing, but not from working. We have a number of smaller evolutionary changes and developments, and some great success stories, but the lack of published stuff was caused by my focus on physical parts and work. Sorry, I don’t have a great dramatic story, it just got to be really nice weather in Florida, and every time I thought about sitting at the keyboard for a few hours to bang out a story, I just went out to the runway and did a few laps around the pattern instead.

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Over the last five or six years, I have averaged 2 or 3 stories a week on this blog. Much of it is just opinions of Florida a grease monkey, but at least half of it has some really valid technical point, either as the main subject or a supporting element, and 20% are purely about minimum understanding of the building and operation of Corvairs to have a reasonable expectation of success.  Since the first of the year, I have quietly interviewed a great number of builders and have come to the honest conclusion that the great majority of builders, good people with good intentions, are still missing many elements of critical information, all available here, they just didn’t read or remember them.

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There is an explanation for this: Our society encourages and admires people who skim subjects rather than mastering them. I know this, but often underestimate how pervasive this is. Ever since my first week at Embry Riddle three decades ago, I have been a voracious reader, studier, and note taker on the parts of aviation that I participate in. Many of the people I know, like Dan Weseman are the same way, and I have always gravitated toward any chance to learn from any aviator who approached the subject the same way.  It doesn’t seem real to me that anyone seriously thinking about building and flying a plane would gather material on the subject in any lesser way, but I have plenty of evidence I am wrong.

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A few weeks ago, a second owner of a Corvair powered plane took off on his first flight, and the weather conditions were 50F and raining. His intention was to fly across the continent, but in a few minutes he was turned back. On approach to the airport, his engine quit and the plane was heavily damaged.  Although he had previously been given all of the manuals, he told the FAA that he didn’t use carb heat. 60 days earlier I wrote this: Critical Understanding #10 – Carb Ice, but evidently he missed that also.

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There is a temptation to think that the above story is an aberration, but it isn’t. I just had a 20 year friend, who came to Corvair colleges, works in aerospace and is a sharp guy come down to my house to run his Corvair. His engine ran great, but he had never heard about the switch in recommended plugs, nor had he heard of the “Critical Understanding” series, nor had he ever joined our private discussion group for his model of aircraft. He just has a lot on his plate in life, and he isn’t staying up with the information. He isn’t alone, I am going to say that he is actually in the majority, and this does cause me concern.

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Someone is going to say “WW writes to much” well great, I just took a whole month off from typing a word, and I am willing to bet the person leveling that charge didn’t use an hour of that month to catch up on reading.  I am kicking around a lot of different thoughts, but in the end, I come back to the fact that too few people are really making a priority of mastering the engine they hope to fly behind.  It isn’t a comforting thought.

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I don’t regard people who miss information as bad people nor the enemy, I just think they are not effectively preparing for flight.  Here is a simple example: When the discussion came up about why I wasn’t writing last month, I guy chimed in to say perhaps I was in NJ caring for my Father.  He evidently missed this story: William E. Wynne Sr. 1925-2017, and the half dozen others I wrote about memories of my father. We are not speaking of a guy who has never met me, I am speaking of a thoughtful guy I am known for 10 years, who I actually saw and ate dinner with at Sun n Fun since my father’s passing. He isn’t a bad guy, but he isn’t reading this blog often enough to stay ahead of detailed information.

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By Oshkosh, I will come up with an approach to address the disconnects in information, but in the end, it is the builders’ total responsibility to learn what he must know. I want to increase his success rate, and I am willing to adjust, but it isn’t within my power to force anyone to do their homework. I just present what I have learned, and it is up to the builder to use it.

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Wewjr.

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