Corvair events on the calendar:

Builders;

Here is a look at what is going on this month:

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In a few days there will be the first ever Sport aviation showcase in Deland Florida. Dan and Rachel Weseman, will have the full commercial Panther display, as well as our Corvair stuff. There will be several Corvair powered birds there, and I am the featured speaker on the 4th. Plan on being there, you will not want to miss it. No sign up required. If there is a part you wish to pick up in person, please call Rachel to coordinate in advance 904-626-7777.  For more information read: Deland FL, “Sport Aviation Showcase” November 3-5

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The following weekend, we are holding the Second Corvair Finishing school in Green Cove Springs at the Panther SPA shop. Please note: this does require signing up. As I write this I believe there are 2 more observer slots left. For up to the minute information, call Rachel at 904-626-7777. Read more here: Finishing School #2, Nov. 11-13, Florida.

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CC #39, March 10-12, 2017,  Barnwell South Carolina: Please note the date change! This College can support nearly 100 builders, but if you were thinking about going, know that there are only 11 slots available.  Below is the active sign up sheet:

https://corviarcollegeregistration.wufoo.com/forms/cc39/  If you had a problem with signing up, try this link.

Website stories: Outlook 2016, Corvair College #39, Barnwell SC, 11/11/16 and Corvair College #39 at Barnwell postponed.  This story has a link about college sign ups, but it was just for people who were transferring from the original date to the March one. The purple link above is the general sign up. Special thanks to Shelley Tumino for setting up the oil line services.

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Blast from the past, 2005:

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February 14, 2005: Grace Ellen and I with Dr. Gary Ray and his Zenith 601XL project.   The plane has been flying now for almost a decade.  It has made pilgrimages to Oshkosh, the Zenith open house and to Corvair College #20. If your project looks like the picture above, know than many great hours of adventure await in your future.

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-ww.

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Thought for the Day: Bob Hoover – What did you learn from him?

Builders:

Last week marked the passing of R.A. “Bob” Hoover, arguably the best stick and rudder pilot who ever lived. There were many ‘tributes’ to him that spoke of things like “What a great loss” and sentiments of that sort. For a slightly different take, let me share a few thoughts that came from a brief conversation with Gus Warren.

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I was a bit tired of all the “huge loss” and RIPS. ” said Gus, “He was in his 90s, led a great life, and figured about every way possible to tell everyone else about what he learned.” At the root of Gus’s thought is a serious question of perspective and philosophy. It can be summed up by asking if you saw Bob Hoover as an instructor or as an entertainer.

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Gus, myself, and many other people see Hoover as an instructor. Yes, he put on thousands of great shows, but they were to demonstrate physics, not a claim to magic. He had a healthy ego, and could play the showman part with the best of them, but it was his consistent message there was no magic, only understanding, focus and practice.

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 He was an honest writer, who’s goal wasn’t to have you marvel at him as a demi-god, but to have you actually learn something from him. Most basic case in point: Hoover frankly discussing that he was relentlessly airsick in primary flight training. Think of how many student pilots questioned if flying was for them based on being queasy, but how few advanced pilots took the time to say it happens and how you get past it.

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Hoover offered countless frank lessons like that. As an instructor, his work is timeless, and it didn’t die with him. As an entertainer, it is all just video now, and his Commander is stuck in the NASM, where it will never fly again. If you only know Hoover the entertainer, the guy pouring iced tea in a glass during a roll, you are missing the better half.  Make the transition to understanding him as an instructor by picking up a copy of his 1997 book “Forever Flying”. It is a good start.

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Above, Gus Warren in the front seat, with his Father Clare Warren in back of our Piet in 1997, Edgewater Florida.  Gus’ father, the legendary Clare Warren, soloed in 1932, got his pilot’s license in 1936, became an instructor in 1940, logged more than 20,000 hours of instruction, and flew most of the models of light aircraft ever produced in the U.S.

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Gus is a flight instructor, and I learned at least half of what I know about good flying directly from him. I had the privilege of knowing Gus’s Dad, and I well understood that things Gus taught me came from his fathers lifetime of experience, as an instructor. Bob Hoover made it to 94, and Clare Warren made it to 97. We don’t have them with us, but we get to cherish everything they worked to share, and in that way they are both still here.

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Read the rest of the story: The Warren’s 1997.

Thought for the Day: Adam Smith, capitalism in a theoretical vacuum

Disclaimer: No technical information follows, just food for thought, a nutrition that zealots have no taste for.

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Builders:

Last week I wrote the story: Made in America – data plates – obituaries to US manufacturing jobs . The basic premise of the story was pointing out what we lost as a country when we turned to buying cheap products from overseas.

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Above, a 2,850 cc Corvair. The only used parts in this engine are the case halves, the head castings, the oil case casting, the distributor body and some misc. hardware. The rest, including the cylinders, pistons rods, crank, and all conversion parts are brand new, made in the United States of America.

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Ironically, a Wall Street Journal writer, Bret Stephens wrote an editorial the same day, part of which extolled the virtues of buying cheap products from overseas. Because Stevens’s biography says went straight from the University of Chicago to the London school of economics to being a New York City resident and editor of the WSJ at the ripe old age of 24, I am going go out on a limb and guess that Stephens doesn’t know much about manufacturing that made America, nor the lives of the people who built the country he lives in.

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Many journalists with a masters degree in economics want to justify their love of Lexuses and perhaps their embarrassment for their parents blue collar jobs, turns to the same paragraph in “The wealth of Nations” written by Adam Smith in 1776, as justification for avoiding buying anything made in America:

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“It is the maxim of every prudent master of a family, never to attempt to make at home what it will cost him more to make than to buy. If a foreign country can supply us with a commodity cheaper than we ourselves can make it, better to buy it of them.”

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OK, econ. 101 refresher course: Western Civilization is allegedly based on Judeo-Christian thought, but unfortunately it is mostly based on the worship of money, not God; Most faiths have an ancient text and a prophet, and the worship of capitalism has the book “The Wealth of Nations” and a prophet in the form of a peculiar Scotsman named Adam Smith. Like other malicious worshipers, the truly greedy benefit from selective reading of their good book and conveniently ignoring unholy elements of their prophet.

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Before getting to why the quote above is ludicrous when applied to both families and countries, a few words about Smith are in order. First, he wasn’t as most people believe, an American, nor in favor of our countries existence; He never made anything other than two books; he was considered by his contemporaries as somewhere between totally absent minded and seriously mentally ill; in spite of his family analogies, he expressed no interest in women, was never married, had no children, and lived with his mother until he was 61.  As a Scotsman, he was required to be a cross dresser, and wear women’s skirts and knee socks. ( I don’t judge them for this, but does everything have to be plaid?)

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Here is why “The Wealth of Nations” is a distorted view of capitalism:  In Smiths world it was ‘normal’ and legal for people to own slaves. Great Britain took this concept to the national level, where they owned other countries (like us). If you can own people, labor has no value, and if you have colonies that have to buy your products at gunpoint, the term market value doesn’t exist. Lets gloss over ideas like 9 year olds working in coal mines because 14 year olds want too much money, and slaves are too valuable for that kind of work. These were ‘normal’ in the world of the prophet of pure capitalism. He also didn’t take into account, corruption, lobbyists, currency manipulation, the eventual rise of imaginary financial instruments like credit default swaps, legislatures for sale, countries bent on war over trade, or any of the other factors that exist outside the vacuum of Smiths imagination. Just maybe, people should be a little more reluctant to draw random quotes from the good book of greed.

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He is an easy (and true) example of why Smiths quote above is national suicide for profit: I have an old friend who is a citizen of an extremely wealthy middle eastern oil country. He tells me that his country is in deep trouble; They have never made anything domestically, they just followed Adam Smiths quote above, and paid for it with oil revenue.  They also came to believe that nearly everything in the country, including pumping the oil, could be done by paid foreigners. Every semi-skilled task is done by Palestinians on open work visas. Even the security forces are staffed with mercenaries. Now the problem: Every day, the world is figuring out how to use less oil, and he finds himself living in a country with fellow citizens who are several generations into having no have no idea how to make anything, while having the work ethic of a millennial addicted to video games. He ends all these conversations with the same exhaled sentence: “We are so screwed”.

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What has that got to do with the good old USA? Follow this idea: We don’t have oil to buy everything with, so we made up something called the ‘national debt,’ spent 20 trillion dollars on that credit card, and the overseas banker got all the money to loan us buy moving our jobs to his place and selling us ‘cheap’ stuff he made in big box stores. This made 1% of America astoundingly rich, and most of us just got stuck with Craftsman tools that are now made in China, and a pile of personal debt. Now the problem: Just as people are figuring out how to use less oil, so are they figuring out that they may no longer need loan us money for our debt. We buy defense critical items from people who hate us and sell uranium to the Russians. Now go back to my old friends quote about his country, and think to yourself “We are so…….”

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OK, before you walk across the street and torch your neighbors Volkswagen that still has the “Gore 2000” sticker in the back window, realize we can still turn this around. We are only one generation into blowing this, and we still have a giant percentage of people who know how to make stuff in this country. We are well educated, and we have a legacy from our parents and grandparents of actual hard work. The key thing is to cut way back or stop buying imported things that we should be making here. Adam Smiths example is stupid, unless you are the kind of parent that says “I can just work all the time if I hire a minimum wage babysitter to raise my kids.” In reality, your country is your family and buying things made here is an investment in your family, which is a lot cheaper in the long run if they learn productive trades rather than you paying kids in families on the other side of town to learn productive trades. Think it over next time someone tells you they bought the imported one because they thought it was “Cheap” or they said they bought it because they support “Free Trade.” Both of these are very surface goals when pitted against the survival of our country.

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Hey William, why are you picking on Al Gore? The reason why I dislike old Al is because he was the single most outspoken champion of making it profitable and easy to ship manufacturing jobs out of this country, NAFTA. One of the great things about YouTube is that you can go and look at how Gore predicted it was actually going to bring waves of new jobs to this country. Right next to him was Ross Perot, who famously said that if NAFTA was passed there would be a “Giant Sucking Sound” until jobs in Mexico went up to $6 an hour, and Jobs in the US came down to the same wage.  He wasn’t exactly right, the people in the US who would have had jobs in manufacturing actually work for $7.25 an hour, but a lot of them have no job today.

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-ww.