Texas Corvair College #36, April 1-3, sign up closes soon

Builders,

Our first college event of 2016, San Marcos on April 1-3, only has 14 more days for sign up. If you are planning on attending this event, the time to act is now: 2016 Corvair College registration pages.

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Blast from past, CC#22 in Texas, Blaine Schwartz’s engine nearing its test run. The above position, with the engine standing on its nose, is my preferred position in which to set the valves.  Read the rest of the story: Schwartz Engine Runs at CC #22. This engine is now flying on Blaine’s Zenith 750: Flying Zenith 750, 2850 cc Corvair, Blaine Schwartz.

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We are just 6 weeks away from CC #36. This is still time to sign up and make good progress, we are even willing to assist finding cores for builders who sign up. Our information network outlined in this story: Outlook 2016 – The Corvair ‘Information Network’ now in gear. can work for anyone, under the condition they decide to “get in the Arena.”

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Keep in mind that we will likely not have a Florida College this year, and the Corvair College we traditionally hold in Mexico Missouri at the Zenith factory in September will have it place taken by being the grand finale stop on the Outlook 2016 – Fall Corv-air-tour. So if you are a builder from the southern or middle of America, this Texas college is your best bet to get your hands dirty and your project started.

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There are many Corvair College links in this story: Outlook 2016, College #36 and Western building tour.

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-ww.

Thought for the Day – “The Best Years of our lives”

Builders,

Here is a companion piece to Thought for the Day: “12 O’clock High”The Best Years of our Lives is a 1946 movie, an unflinching look at the lives of three men returning home from WWII. It was widely hailed as a masterpiece, winning 9 Academy Awards, but today 70 years later, it is gone from the national awareness.

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If you have never seen it, I highly recommend it. It really isn’t just a WWII film, the messages in it are timeless. The craft work of the film, the direction, the shooting and sound stand up decades later. Many people consider it Dana Andrews finest performance, but the film is captured by Harold Russell who had never acted before. He was a WWII veteran who lost his hands in an explosives accident. In the film he offers a brutally honest look at a disabled veteran returning to his home, family and fiancée, now a young man without hands. It is very difficult to watch.

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Opening scene of the film, where the three men are flying home in a B-17, to an uneasy welcome in the town they left. It turns out that it hasn’t changed at all, but the men are changed and can not find an easy path ‘home’.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=scXCe1i_hJQ

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Above is a YouTube link to the best remembered part of the film. Dana Andrews, who has returned to find his marriage gone, his job meaningless, and outspoken civilians who mock his service, wanders out into an aircraft graveyard and questions why everything has happened.  He walks past hundreds of  B-17s and P-39s being scrapped. Sitting in the nose of a B-17 he dissolves into a flashback of being under attack on a bombing run.  Listen to how effectively the sound track supports the somber film.

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Your Aviation Connection: At Oshkosh, our booth is just 100 yards from the Warbird area. We are so busy during the day that I hardly leave the booth, but it stays light very late in the summer months in Wisconsin, and long after the crowds fade away I often walk over to the warbird area and quietly look at the planes. I find it a better setting to consider the struggles their crews faced, both in combat and coming home.

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If you have the emotional fortitude, read the chapter “Speaking of Courage” in Tim O’Brien’s 1990 book The Things They Carried.  Norman, the central character in the chapter, a young Vietnam vet returning to his small Midwestern town is destroyed by his inability to find anyone to listen to a bitter truth he knows. In some of his other writings O’Brien explains the genesis of the chapter, and how post war stories are a different set of experiences. It is the same relationship 12 O’clock high has to The best years of our lives.

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-ww.

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