2,775 cc Piston and Cylinder kits

Builders,

Last week our piston manufacturer in California, the same one we have used for years to make 2,850 and 3,000 cc pistons, called to say that my order of 2,775 cc pistons will be done by the third week of October. I placed a very large order with them a while back, and these will be delivered in time to make their public debut at Corvair College #35 at Barnwell.

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These pistons are a large overbore on a stock 1965 Corvair cylinder. They are aimed at being able to run 89 octane auto fuel with 95 heads or 92 octane with 110 heads. Because they are a bored, the cylinder set is several pounds lighter than a smaller engine, and lighter than a 2,850 with it’s thicker wall full-fin cylinders. I already have several hundred original cylinders at Clark’s Corvairs, ready to be bored to match these new piston sets.

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These pistons are made with spiral locks, so they can have floating wrist pins, and be easier to assemble than stock pistons which need to heat the rods to install the wrist pins. The ring sets are .060″ over Hastings Chrome rings, the same ones we have put into Corvairs for more than 20 years. Because these pistons have floating pins, they can also use the new billet rods available from the Weseman’s at SPA/Panther.

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These will not appear on our products page until they are here, we are not selling them yet, we don’t need deposits, etc., but if you are interested, you can always send us a note with “2,775” in the subject line. we will let you know more in a few weeks.

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-ww.

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Above, a 2,850 piston made in the USA, specifically designed for flight engines. The  “2,775 cc”  looks identical, but is .045″ less in diameter and has a different chamber volume.  I wrote a story about having these on the back burner of development 24 months ago, but the project will be done shortly, and they will be an option for builders. read more: Getting Started in 2013, Part #15, 2,775cc.

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Thought for the day: Hubris

“There is a word for being really sure you are on the right path and willfully ignoring the advice of others who suggest course corrections, it is Hubris.

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I am not particularly religious, but one can get a look at the Old Testament to see some fine examples of how the Universe is said to ‘reward’ people who suffer from hubris. I have never seen anyone turned into a pillar of salt, but I have seen unpleasant things happen to people who never stopped to think that they might be wrong about what they are doing in aviation.

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People who really know me, understand that on the outside I am willing to share with confidence what we have long proven in flight to be true. But when it comes to new and unknown, I approach with great caution, and always asking myself the quiet inner question “What am I missing about this?” It is the only path to improvement in aviation that I have consistently seen rewarded. Hubris almost always ends up elsewhere.

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-ww.

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Above a 11 year old photo from our Edgewater hangar. Our 601XL sits behind our newly built torque reactive dynamometer. From the 2004 caption: “Its operation is very simple. Everything seen in blue rotates on the crankshaft’s axis. If you look closely, you can see that the bearing is the front spindle, hub and wheel removed from a late model Corvair. The bed type mount is slung low so that the crankshaft centerline lines up exactly with the spindle. The reinforcements below the engine contact a bearing at the bottom of the stand for additional support. This is a Corvair blower bearing rolling sideways on a steel plate. It effectively has no drag. Below the spindle is the mounting point for the hydraulic cylinder. The green oxygen bottle has been converted to a gravity feed fuel tank on the test stand.”