Housecall: 3,000 cc Corvair on Waiex

Builders,

Last week we took a 2,350 mile tour of the East Coast. The primary purpose of the trip was a last minute decision to surprise my mother in NJ on her 87th Birthday. This meant staying up very late Friday to pack and ship builder parts on Saturday am, and then drive all afternoon and night to get to NJ by 9 am Sunday. Tiring, but it worked out. When your combined parents age is 176.5 years old, it is not smart to miss any chance to see them. I knew this, but in the last year several builders who have lost their parents have quietly reminded me how lucky I am to still have both of mine. It is wise counsel from the heart.

We combined several other stops in a 36-hour blur of travel on the way back: House calls to Phil Maxson’s 601XL, a visit to Grace’s aunt and uncle, a stop at SARCO Inc. in Easton, PA, lunch at the giant Cabella’s outside Harrisburg, a trip to the Corvair Ranch in Gettysburg, PA, and a house call on Greg Crouchley’s Waiex.

Greg has been to a great number of Corvair Colleges, and is pretty well known in Corvair building circles by the un-approved nickname “Stud,”  which is related to the point “Don’t tease Grace when she is making College name tags.” Pictured below with Greg is his co-builder Mike Sterling, who was also at Corvair College #24 at Barnwell, where they assembled the 3,000 cc Corvair for the Waiex.

I have a number of links at the bottom for further reading on this project, including video of the engine running on our stand.

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Net052114Builders

Above Mike, at left, and Greg in front of the plane in Mike’s garage where the plane is being built near Martinsburg, WV. Their home airport is Green Landings, a few miles away. The plane is well over 90% done and should fly this summer. Mike is a USAF vet with an impressive 34 years of work on aircraft. Greg has several homebuilts completed in the past decade. With the Waiex nearing completion, Greg has already started a Corvair powered Zenith 750.

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Net052114Reverse

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Above, a look at the engine showing how the reverse gold oil filter housing fits on Waiex and Cleanex/Sonex airframes. This plane also has a Group 2800 heavy duty oil system installed. Note how close the filler neck on a Sonex is to the back of the engine. The tank is plastic, which is good, but it was also criminally irresponsible for now broke companies to advocate putting a rear starter on a Corvair in this application. You don’t need an engineering degree nor one in accident investigation to understand that the engine could become displaced in a fairly minor ground accident, causing the ring gear from a rear starter, with it’s spinning exposed teeth, to come in contact with the plastic filler neck just as the contents of the tank are rushing forward. If you are one of the people who got stuck with such an engine, I am sorry, but I don’t assist people in doing crazy things, and I will not help you nor allow such engines to be brought to Colleges. There is one of these engine being dumped on Barnstormers this week, an expensive mistake one person is trying to pawn off on a stranger.  P.T. Barnum said “There is a sucker born every minute,” and he apparently has more followers in aviation than a long-haired guy in sandals who tried to popularize the saying “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

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Net052114side

 

 

Above, a side view from the pilot’s side of the plane. Note the oil cooler’s laid down position on a Cleanex style installation. On a standard installation, we have it turned 90 degrees from this and tilted 30 degrees. On a Cleanex/Waiex, the mount, intake and nosebowl come from Dan Weseman: the baffling is from JSWeseman.com, and we do the engine parts and the U-1 stainless exhaust.

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Net052114panel

Above, the super simple panel. Please note that some of it is from MGL, not my favorite brand. If you are going to use MGL, please read this: MGL vs Corvair ignition issue. Dan Weseman had the same issue with the panel in his Panther, and this is part of the reason why he switched to a GRT panel. If you are using MGL stuff with a Corvair, please contact Dan; there are ways of divorcing the tach from the ignition.

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Net0521Suburban

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Above, our transportation for the trip, the 1993 Suburban and the trailer. This is actually the well painted side of the truck. It appeared in the background of a story the EAA did on Corvair Colleges. If you look closely at the printed picture, the staff artists photoshopped it to hide the sections of missing white paint. In this photo, the trailer has 10 core engines inside that we bought from the Corvair Ranch the day before.  Between CC#26 in MO, #27 in SC, #28 in TX, and this trip, the $1,700 Suburban has logged 13,500 trouble-free miles in 9 months. I gladly drive a beater truck to allow the budget to support all the tools and aircraft I enjoy. No car you ever buy will make you as proud as any plane you build with your hands.

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For further reading:

Thoughts on what Greg gets out of homebuilding:

Guest Editorial, Greg Crouchley, Waiex/Corvair builder.

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A look at Greg’s engine:

World’s Strongest 3,000cc Corvair, built by Greg Crouchley

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A look at the parts that go into the Sonex/Waiex Corvair installation:

Corvair power for Panther and Sonex reference page

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Mickey Wynne turns 87 today.

Builders,

How do you express your gratitude to the person you owe your very existence to? Simply put, you can’t. My mother, Emma Marie Heuer, aka “Mickey Wynne” turns 87 years old today. She has given our family a sterling example of kindness and compassion to follow. Every element of human decency and empathy that resides in me owes its absolute origin directly to her.

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img008 Above, my mother at age 26, standing in front of their 1951 Buick super eight Convertible. Mom had just had my older brother 6 weeks before. My father was being shelled in Korea at the moment of his son’s birth. You can read the story of my brother’s arrival at this link:

MCW is 60 today.

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The finest hours of my life, those I gave to others, all bear the indelible prints of my mothers faith, that kindness and forgiveness are the ultimate virtues. In the four score and seven years she has been on this earth, she has never wavered in her belief, nor missed a chance to demonstrate her fidelity to it. She is held in the hearts of all who know her.

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On this mother’s day I wish everyone a peaceful hour of reflection on the lives of the women that each of us owe our very existence to.

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Thought for the Day: What are you thankful for?

“If you have never met me, but read this and think that I am charmed with myself, you got it all wrong. I know countless humans who are better people than I. They are kinder, smarter, and harder working. I can’t sing nor dance, I learn slowly, and I can’t stand to hear my recorded voice nor see my image on film. If I was once handsome, all trace of it is gone along with my uncorrected eyesight. I can be a conversational bore, and I deeply wish I had given my parents more moments to be proud of me. At 50 I look back on my life with a very critical eye and stand on the far side of a very wide gulf from the heroes of my youth. Even our dog, impeccably honest and loyal as canines are, Loves Grace and only tolerates me.

Honest evaluation leads to harsh thoughts like this. I spend a lot of time alone and have long bouts of insomnia, which can lead to thinking about things excessively. But the secret I would like to share with anyone who at times feels the same way, is that I have a sanctuary where I am insulated from much of my self-criticism, and a have a front, where at 50, I am much better on than I thought possible in my youth. When I am building things with my hands in my shop, I rarely feel poor. Although I now need glasses to do any close work, and my hands have lost a lot of dexterity, I am a far better craftsman than I ever was in my youth. I am not a great craftsman, but over a very long time I have worked to develop these elements in my life, and I compete with no one except who I was last year. While all else fades, these things flourish. It is a gift I am most thankful for.”

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Read the whole story at this link: New die spring landing gear on a Pietenpol, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

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Grace in our 601XL leaving Brodhead WI, headed to Oshkosh 2004.

 

Thought for the day: Challenge of an open mind

“If a man, holding a belief which he was taught in childhood or persuaded of afterwards, keeps down and pushes away any doubts which arise about it in his mind, purposely avoids the reading of books and the company of men that call into question or discuss it, and regards as impious those questions which cannot easily be asked without disturbing it–the life of that man is one long sin against mankind.”

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William Clifford, The Ethics of Belief – 1877.

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Homebuilding, at the very core of the actual experience is learning. People often mistake assembling a plane as the experience, but that can be done without learning much, and without learning, a builder has only traded his hours and money for a plane he could have just bought. Thus, the learning defines the value of the experience.

My business is teaching a set of specific skills, and a general philosophy to homebuilders. In a given year, about 1/4 of my time is wasted, because, no matter how I champion learning, we still get a significant number of people who just want to get their aircraft assembled, while learning as little as possible.  My goal is to share what I know, and theirs is to simply have something, there is little common ground there.

Clifford’s quote above is an excellent tool for sorting those who wish to learn from those that merely want to keep every old wives tale and half truth they were ever told about planes intact, because they think this will require less effort and thinking.  Clifford was speaking about serious topics like philosophy, science and theology, but I uphold that flight is a serious subject also, and people who don’t wish to learn would be safer leaving planes alone.

Without fail, when you encounter a person who’s life is a continuous series of new things learned, new perspectives considered, evolved thinking, you have met someone alive and well worth knowing. Conversely, the people you meet who are ever more attached to something they heard and long ago and adopted dogmatically, to the point that they will cling to it in the face of all evidence to the contrary, are not going to be people who enrich your life with their presence.

I communicate with many people in a year, of these, I know many. A much smaller number I know as friends, and inside this is a still smaller circle of very unique individuals. Perhaps the only thing they have in common is the older they get, the more likely they are to Wonder, to Ask, to Question and  to Consider. They have more information and ideas than they did in years past, but the search has taught them all to distrust the packaged and provided answers the lazy and tired accept as ‘truth.’ One life is an ever richer journey, while many others simply settle for an easily reached, but dull destination. My personal definition of being an aviator is to travel, not in the geographic sense, but from who you were before to who you are today, to who you will be tomorrow. Clifford’s quote describes the sin of these three places having no space between them.

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There are many greats in aviation, and homebuilding has it’s share, but there was only one life that stands out “like mars at perihelion.”  This is Steve Wittman, greatest air racer who ever lived, builder and designer, pilot of incredible talent. He relentlessly evolved for 70 years in aviation.

When I was 31 years old, he took me flying in the Olds-Tailwind, N37SW. He wrung the plane out for 25 minutes in a display of skill that I was hard pressed just to fathom. Wittman was 91 years old. Afterward, he took me in the hangar and showed me some new ideas he was incorporating into a brand new set of Tailwind wings he was in the process of building.

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Above, Steve Wittman in his “Buttercup”. He built the plane in 1937. Through out his life he changed many things on the plane, the gear, the engine, the span, the wing tips, adding leading edge devices, making the tail cantilever, etc. Although he was a brilliant designer, and won 375 air races in planes he designed and built, he never rested on his laurels. He was deaf to praise and past glory when there was anything new to try or learn.

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Mail Sack: Builder Questions #2 Panther Engine

Builders,

Here is the second of a new series, where I take actual letters from builders and answer the questions here, where the answers can serve many builders. Because the writers sent in the questions as private email, I have trimmed their name off the email to respect their privacy. Their questions are in blue, I put the answer in black. You can click on the colored links in the answers to read stories with longer explanations.

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Mr. Wynne,

I have on order from SPA a full LSA Panther kit.  I don’t have an engine.  To
save you some time I will list my current questions and then write my general
palaver. What are the details of your next Corvair College in MO?  Cost?  What must I
bring?  Is a core needed or can I buy it from you?

CC#30 will be in September in Mexico MO, at the Zenith Factory. The cost will be about $79, this will cover food and drinks for 3 days. The learning is free. We will have the registration page up in another week or so. You don’t have to bring anything, you can just come and observe. If you wish to assemble an engine, there is much prep work you must do in advance, the task is too big to just start with a greasy core on day one and finish with an engine on day 3. However, you can fully assemble an engine and run it from a collection of prepped parts, and have a good understanding of that engine, in three days. The best spot to learn a lot more about colleges in general is here: Corvair College reference page

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What do you think of the Aeroinjector?  I intend to fly Sportsman and possibly
Intermediate IAC aerobatics.

There have been thousands of hours flown on Corvairs with Aerocarbs, the red flat side predecessor to the Aeroinjector. There are reasons why they have their fans, but It is not a carb I would choose for a Corvair, and I would never run one in a fuel system with a pump. I know it can be done, but that doesn’t mean I would choose to. To learn more about carbs look at: Carburetor Reference page. Dan’s panther runs an MA3-SPA and he performs a lot of aerobatics with it. If you wanted to move up one level, look at a Rotec carb or an Ellison EFS-3A. The Ellison is now out of production. (After 30 years and thousands of carbs, Ben Elison perhaps has gotten a little tired of homebuilders who don’t read instruction and ‘experts’ on his products who have never used one) You have to speak with Dan, but his original plan was to use a precision mechanical injector for advanced work. see a picture below and read more at this link:Mechanical Fuel Injection Testing.

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I have been reading your websites.  You have a wealth of information and, you
obviously, have a masterful level of skill and knowledge.  You and Dan give a
lot of creditability to using a Corvair engine.

Thank you. I remind people if you do something for 25 years, you have a good opportunity to become very good at it, especially if the job involves teaching it to other people.

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My personal experience comes from a 1/3 ownership of a Cessna 172 and a Bellanca
Citabria 7KCAB.  Both had Lycoming O-320 engines.  Of course, the Citabria was
fuel injected.  Both engines ran without problem given regular oil changes,
compression checks, and general TLC from all 3 owners.  That gives me a base of
confidence in Lycoming engines.  So an obvious choice, for me, in an LSA
aircraft for aerobatic use would be a Lycoming IO-233.  The problem is that
Lycoming is not very forthcoming with information about this engine.  Also, the
nearest that I can tell is that a new engine would cost me over $30,000.  That
gives me the impression that Lycoming doesn’t want to service the LSA Homebuilt
market.

I have seen a 233, and it is impressive. It is not as light as the promoters suggest, but that is true of most engines and airframes in experimental aviation. ( A standard 10% error is what I call CBW- calibrated brochure weight, which is the actual weight multiplied by .9 for marketing purposes) You are correct, Lycoming, and continental in particular, don’t go out of their way to serve homebuilders. They certainly are not going to hold a free ‘Continental College’ any time soon.

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What are my other choices?  Rotax?  No!  I’ve been flying planes that cruise at
2400 rpm.  Reduction for prop rotation or not, the high rpm would never let me
feel comfortable.  UL, short TBO and too expensive.  How about Continental?
Some possibilities here.  An O-200 with and Aeroinjector is a possibility with
less power and high cost.  Then there is the Jabiru 3300.  A real possibility.
Better cost than a Continental, but is it as reliable?  I don’t know.

There are a lot of choices, and you sound like you have looked at most of them. Your previous flight and aircraft ownership background is actually serving to inform and fine tune your choices. Builders just getting started with little or no personal reference have a hard time navigating this selection because magazines and other pilots don’t offer much valid input. Reading our site gives a good look at our perspectives and philosophy, which I hold to be more important that exact weight or cost.

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I like the idea of an engine that I have built myself.  I’m sure that I can do
the job.  Earlier in my life I rebuilt a slant-6 Dodge Dart engine that had been
oil starved and experience cam shaft bearings piggybacking.  I follow directions
very well when I have confidence in my sources.

You sound like our kind of guy. Because I teach this stuff instead of just selling a product in a box, I am particularly good at directions. I find it very funny that if you look at any modern product in a store, the guy who wrote the directions inside was obviously the low man on the totem pole. Every other person involved, marketing, packaging, legal, etc, got more of the budget to work with. Businesses try that in experimental aviation all the time, and it never works. Shiny wrapping paper often = Empty box.

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Although I have never been a fan of the Corvair car,  The engine is looking very
attractive to me.  All of the flying video of the Panther (I’ve watched it all
more than once) allows me to know that 120hp is all that I need.  My greatest
uneasiness is with fuel supply.  Everything I read about the Panther engine
tells me that fuel starvation during basic aerobatics is not a serious problem.
I don’t think that I will know for sure until I try.

If you see the plane fly in person, you will be even more impressed than watching it on film. It captures the eye and holds it. The level of flight Dan gets from a standard fuel system is hardly to be believed. A simple change to a Rotec or Ellison and a flop tube would go even further.

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At this point, I think that the Corvair 3000cc with all of Dan’s tricks is my
best choice.  Of course, I haven’t received any of the airframe kits yet so time
is still fluid.  The idea of building an engine in September is very attractive.

FYI: I live in Orange County California and have building space in the EAA
hanger in Chino.  A road trip to Mexico, MO may be very enjoyable if I were to
return home with a working engine for my Panther.

Our Good friend Steve Glover runs NVaero.com at the Chino airport. The next Corvair College we hold in CA, likely in 2015 will be at his place. However, I would suggest Mexico MO because we bring several thousand pounds of parts and tools to Eastern Colleges, where as we are limited in resources on west coast colleges. If you want to drive back with an engine, we need to get started in a few weeks with a plan that does a little prep work every week: Getting Started Reference page

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Thank you for your consideration,

You are welcome.

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Further reading:

Corvair power for Panther and Sonex reference page

3,000 vs 3,100 cc Corvair engines.

Why Not the Panther engine?

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Above, a rear view of the engine. Behind the harmonic balancer is an alternator driven off the crank through a flexible coupler. It is a  project that Dan and I worked on, that he now sells as a rear alternator kit, P/N 2950.  It retains the balancer and cannot put bending loads on the crank. I have never been a fan of belts on the back of the engine, but this system does not use one. The alternator is the same Yanmar unit we traditional use on the front of the engine.

The intake is a custom stainless part made in our fixture so that it mates with our traditional welded on head pipes. On the bottom of the intake is the Precision mechanical fuel injection unit. Dan has designed the Panther to have tremendous airframe strength. The test wing took more than 9Gs at gross weight in a sandbag test conducted after Sun N Fun. Although Dan designed the plane to be easy to fly, it is capable of impressive aerobatics.

Mail Sack: Builder Questions, #1 RV-9?

Builders,

Here is the first of a new series, where I take actual letters from builders and answer the questions here, where the answers can serve many builders. Because the writers sent in the questions as private email, I have trimmed their name off the email to respect their privacy. Their questions are in blue, I put the answer in black. You can click on the colored links in the answers to read stories with longer explanations.

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William,

Would you please answer some questions for me?

1. I have a Corvair conversion manual, #7856 that I purchased when I met you at the Arlington Washington airshow probably 6 years or more ago. It is a 2006 version. Is that still the most current version of the manual?

The manual has had many small updates since then, but if you read this site and keep up with the comments here, you do not need a new manual. Since 2006 we have written a very popular flight ops manual that you should consider.

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2. I have found 2 engines – an RB and a YN. From your manual it appears that I could use everything minus the heads from the RB engine and the heads from the YN – if I bought both of them. Is this true or would you recommend waiting for a better engine?

The RB is a 140 HP manual transmission engine. If the crank does not need to be reground, you can magnaflux it and use it as it with a Dan Gen I bearing. Read this story: Getting Started in 2013, Part #5, ‘Allan Able’ short block. If the YN engine is a 1964 (it could be an un-useable 61-63) The heads will bolt on and work.

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3. Would I have to re-nitride the crank from the RB engine or just do a magnaflux inspection?

See above.

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4. In your manual and web pages you say that an engine should cost no more than $150 to $200. Is that still what most used engines are going for?

$250 to $300 is more common these days but plenty of guys who run adds on craigslist looking for engines pay less.

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5. Has anyone used a Corvair engine in an RV-9 or -9A?

The only model RV that has flown on a Corvair was a -3. The guy had it on there and flew it for several years, but had issues. He had a turbo, injected 3,100, not really what I would call simple nor representative of how we suggest people do things. For all this work, it was not significantly faster than Dan’s 3,000 cc Panther prototype, which is totally reliable. You can’t really blame the engine for not being what some people wanted.

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6. If not – why not? I think a 120 hp Corvair engine with the Weseman billet crank is a perfect fit for the RV-9. Even with all of the successful CH650/Corvair installations, I think the RV-9 is a better airplane than the Zenith, even though the Corvair engine would have to be moved ~7″ forward in the RV-9 to stay away from the aft CG limit.

Some people like Van’s products, others like Zeniths. You should build the one you like. I am sure the combination would work, but just about every RV-9 I have seen, including the one that belongs to my next door neighbor, has 150 or more HP.  RV-9 would probably be faster, but the Zenith would get off faster and might have a better climb rate.  It will take 1/2 the time to build a Zenith 650.  I have spent a fair chunk of time in person with both Chris Heintz and Richard Vangrunsven, and I will say that Heintz’s personal philosophy on individual choice appeals to me more. I have many friends with RV’s but I occasionally get tired of the element of the RV-fan club that attacks anyone who proposes something different, like putting a Corvair in a -9. Those people seem to forget that the RV-1 was a modified Ray Stitts design, and if Stitts had the same attitude, there would be no such thing as an RV-anything.  The guy who runs the Van’s Airforce website has made some very negative comments about freedom of choice in flying and turning people into the FAA. In 11 years of working with the Heintz family, I have never found an element like that. I don’t need everyone to love nor understand what I am doing, but it is tiring if the official attitude toward ‘experimental’ is negative.

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7. Could you design and fabricate an engine mount for a Corvair/RV9 installation?

Yes. It would be easier to start with a an existing RV-9 mount to get the gear leg sockets already done. If you would like to see the geometry, it would be nearly identical to this one we built for the Wittman Buttercup:( http://www.flycorvair.com/hangar1209.html )  there are several photos at that website. See picture below.

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8. When will you hold the next Corvair College on the West Coast?

We are giving a lot of thought to having one in Chino, but I hope to have a California tour before the end of the year, even if we can’t organize a full blown college until 2015. -ww.

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From 2009 “ Above, a motor mount for our Wittman Buttercup project. It is an intensely complicated Mount because it incorporates Wittman’s tapered rod landing gear sockets (the Buttercup actually uses RV-6 landing gear legs). I spoke on the phone with Earl Luce, the plans provider. He gave me all the operational data and weight and balance info for his O-200 powered plane, which I mathematically worked out to our own installation. The Mount resembles the O-300 mount for a Tailwind.  After completely welding it, I took it to our local powdercoater, and had it done in U.S. Navy gray. It is the 40th different Corvair Motor Mount Design that I have built.”

 

Letter of the Day: Wooden Pusher aircraft

Builders:

The letter below comes from Art Blake.  It is referencing a comment that I made in the story: Steel tube fuselages, “Safe” planes and 250mph accidents. Art has obviously extensively studied the Corvair option, and after his letter, I will clarify my point on Wooden pusher aircraft. I print the letter here because Art sent it in as a public comment, and I think his enthusiasm for building comes right through. Words many of us can relate to.

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“Dear Mr. Wynne,
I am totally psyched. I have not been this excited since my youngest son was born.
The kids are settling into happy lives and are contributing to the Common Good. My wife is comfortably situated, and last fall I made up my mind- it is time for me to break these surly bonds, build an actual aircraft, and FLY !!
I have the requisite experience: tree houses, go kart, R/C planes, and I even set the timing on my old Chevy Vega, using a light !
After much agonizing and searching and consideration, I decided on my plane, and I decided to power it with a rebuild Corvair engine. Last week for my birthday, I got my Corvair motor and my plans are on the way. I’m 1/2 way through ‘Stick and Rudder, joined EAA, and have studied lots of the building techniques tapes. The plans for my Pride and Joy are on their way! I can’t wait to get started……

And now, now, I read that you would not fly in a wood frame aircraft with a pusher engine.

I’m flummoxed, astounded, flabbergasted, crushed.
I’m speechless, horrified, bothered and bewildered.

The craft I chose, and am so psyched to build and fly, is a Volmer V-J 22, “Sportsman” – yes, A WOOD FRAME AIRCRAFT WITH A PUSHER ENGINE !.
From your blogs, I have learned that you are not someone to give a gratuitous ‘pat on the head’ to someone who is about to so something you can not condone, but, can you throw me a bone, man?
Will I be building a deathtrap? Do I have to decide between (1) building The Flaming Comet as planned, or (2) riveting together a Belite, strapping on a 1/2 VW, and flying whining circles around the airstrip, like some angry hornet, until either the motor falls off, or I fly it into the trees, just to break the monotony?
I suspect you do not say things lightly, and I need to know – is this list of ‘safety preferences’ based on actual statistics, or is it a private opinion, a Gestalt, or the result of some bad experience(s) for you?
Help me out, I dyin’ here.
-Art Blake”

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Art,

I thought your letter was very funny, you are a good writer. When I wrote the comment about wooden pushers, I was specifically thinking of a Rutan Vari-Viggen, (which incidentally, actually flew with a Corvair for one builder in the 1980s) I admire Rutan, but not for that design.  You are quite correct that some opinions are formed from negative experience rather than pure statistics. At the very bottom is an excerpt of something I wrote about a disturbing day.

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Although the stall speed of a Vari-Viggen is listed as 48 mph, compare all the specifications on it’s Wikipedia page to those of a Van’s RV-4, another O-320 powered two seat plane. Although not perfect, the RV-4 probably has a much better statistical record than the 20 vari-viggens that flew. I have experienced friends who have built and flown Rutan designs (Arnold Holmes) and friends who chose not to (Dan Weseman).  I consider both of them very good at risk management, but they use their planes differently also.

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My comments don’t directly apply to the VJ-22, and I will tell you that I have many times considered building one. The low landing speed mitigates a lot of the wooden construction issues, but I would still put a plastic tank in it or a fuel cell, and I would carefully consider what type of terrain I overflew at low altitude. I do this with all aircraft, but my factors would be adjusted with a VJ-22.  Of course, it would be a very low risk in an engine out if you were over water. As the story stated, it is all about making your own decisions.

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The Corvair/VJ-22 combination has been done before. Below is a picture from our website of a plane built by Claude Delebruere, of Newport, Vermont. He flew it about 100 hours on a Corvair, and later went to a bigger engine. The link below the plane leads to other photos and a description. You can find obscure stuff like this on our main website by using the search box at the bottom of the main page:

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http://www.flycorvair.com/delabruere.html.

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Below, an excerpt from our risk management story: Risk Management, Wrong airframe, Wrong experience level. I am writing about a Sunday morning at an SAA fly-in in Champaign-Urbana Ill. The pilot who wisely stopped anyone from calling the man’s wife was our friend Doc Mosher. I was going to ask him how, in the chaos of the moment, he kept a clear line of thought like that, but later reflected that after 20,000 hours and five decades of flying, this was not the first accident Doc had seen.

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“If anyone wants to write me debating that pusher aircraft with composite or wood fuselages are not good test planes, please read the Vari-Viggen/O-320 accident report below first. I was on hand for the crash 10 years ago. I had spent the previous day admiring the man’s craftsmanship and personal style. He was a stand out in a group of 1,000 people at Frasca. The soy bean field he had a forced landing in was big and flat enough that I am pretty sure I could have landed at DC-3 in it. His fuselage did not protect him. It had poured rain the day before and it was later thought he had water in the fuel. With many planes this would have been an non-accident, but the man’s airframe choice did not work for him on that day. His wife had driven there and previously left for a 6 hour trip home. Some one was going to call her, but a pilot with 50+ years of experience stopped them so the woman could get all the way home and back to family before finding out she was a widow.”

http://www.ntsb.gov/aviationquery/brief2.aspx?ev_id=20020617X00903&ntsbno=CHI02LA166&akey=1

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