Corvair College #28 Texas, last 24hrs. to sign up

Builders:

I am going to have Ken Pavlou, our on line sign up guy, cut off the #28 page at this time Saturday. (Shortly after, we will have the sign up for CC#29, March 28-30 Leesburg FL activated.) If you are going to Texas, the time to act is at hand.

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I just got off the phone with Corvair/601XL pilot Andy Elliott, and he is flying in to CC#28 from Arizona. Above, Andy’s aircraft at the EAA Chapter 1 Open House, Riverside, Calif.

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In the last day, we have several new builders sign up, including Dean and Robynn Trzynka. We had met them at Oshkosh over several years, and they were forming a plan to get into homebuilding. They were pretty sure the plane for them is a Pietenpol. I spoke with Dean on the phone two nights ago, and he made the decision that he would not longer put off getting started.

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He and Robynn signed up, and are packing their core engine to bring and make progress. Get this part: The drive to Texas is 20 hours, each way. Will it be worth it? To the builder who has decided that this year will be his, that he will not put off dreams he has long had, yes, it will be well worth 40 hours of driving.

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Not only will they make great progress and learn skills and procedures, they will also make good friends in home building, These friends are different than the people in your local EAA chapter who talk about planes, but always seem to have reasons never to build or fly them. The friends we have a colleges are people who are in the arena. And if you are a guy who will drive 40 hours to advance your dreams, you have a place among these builders. When I included the words from T.R. in the manual:

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“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and  blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”

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I am not kidding. Yes Teddy wrote and said that in Paris 114 years ago, but words are just as true today. Few of us will have what he called his “Crowded Hour” in life, charging San Juan hill. But none the less, we face countless quieter choices, moments when you decide that you will take the controls…..or you will take a seat with the cold and timid, who all had reasons why it was OK to let their life drift by. Everyone has a place in this world, and it isn’t for me to say where anyone belongs. But if it is your own life, make damn sure you are on the right path. Time insures that we all end up at a destination, I am only here to suggest finding the path to the destination you would prefer.

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Later this year we will be at Oshkosh. As always, our tent will be a gathering point for builders and flyers from near and far. Although I love the planes, I like the people a lot more.  Everyone is welcome, and we see many of the same faces every year. The Cook out is the big event, but the camaraderie goes on from early each day to hours after all the other booths are closed.

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Some of the builders on hand will have flown in with their planes. Others will have made good progress and be speaking of serious plans to get to the finish line. There are several dozen people each day, many that you will recognize from stories on this site.

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Like all other years, and all other shows, there will be people who want to get started, but always have some rational reason not to. I am a realist, and I understand that homebuilding isn’t possible for everyone. There are the needs of young kids and older parents, and a thousand other tasks. But truth be told, many more people are held back, not by family obligation or commitment, they are just restrained by nagging doubt brought on by a lifetime of exposure to negative people, all filled with a myriad of reasons why they don’t have dreams and therefore you shouldn’t either.

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Into this setting will walk two people who’s year in aviation will be different than their previous years. Dean and Robynn will arrive with pictures of their engine, and parts of their plane. They will be greeted by fellow Piet builders they got to know at CC#28, great people like Kevin and Shelley and Mark Chouinard. They will have supportive friends who they stayed in touch with since the college. There will be kidding and fun, ideas and thoughts. all the while they will be thinking about the plane they are building and all the places they will fly in it. Except it will no longer be a daydream, it will be a plan. Because they decided that ‘someday’ had come for them, and from here forward, they would be in the Arena.

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https://corvaircollege.wufoo.com/forms/corvair-college-28-

registration/

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More info here: Corvair College #28, getting to last call

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Oshkosh 2013: When setting up the tent, a lot of things like hanging up display motor mounts in the top of the tent went quick with the help of 6’5″ Pietenpol builder Mark Chouinard. I have looked at this photo many times, but just noticed the dog sleeping in the trailer.

Builders Perspectives reference page.

Builders:

Over the last two years we have had a number of friends write an extended piece to share their perspective on a topic in homebuilding. Below are a collection of these stories. The aviators here are known guys in the Corvair movement.

Consider: Kevin Purtee, host of CC#22 and #28, Cherry Grove trophy 2012; Arnold Holmes, host of CC#17, #25 and #29; Phil Maxson, director of the ‘Zenvair’ list and Cherry Grove trophy 2013; Jeff Moores, furthest north Corvair pilot, most float time on a Corvair; Terry Hand, ATP/USMC, runs our youth program; Greg Crouchley, frequent contributor, now building 2nd Corvair powered plane; Oscar Zuniga, host of 2003 College in San Antonio, Texas.

I am going to put this story up on our home page of Flycorvair.com. Most companies have some form of testimonials on their website.  It’s common enough that people tend to look at ‘5 star’ product reviews, but they often don’t say much or are easily faked. Conversely, I think these stories offer a great testimonial, not to any particular product of ours, but to building a Corvair and to home building in general.  They are from real aviators and express their real thoughts on homebuilding. I think they make an outstanding case for the rewards of traditional Home building by the motto of “Learn, Build and Fly.” If their stories ring true, welcome to your home in home building. -ww.

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Click on any color link to read the full story.

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Guest Writer: Pietenpol builder/flyer Kevin Purtee  “A lot of people build airplanes and then are afraid to fly them.  Got it.  It can be scary sometimes.  The only way to solve that, move on, and get better is to GO FLY!  I found one major aspect of my professional flying to be very difficult when I first started.  I vowed to get better at that aspect.  The only way to get better is to practice.”

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To see more of Kevin’s work look at: Pietenpol review in pictures, 15 more Corvair powered Piets and you can read about the College he and Shelley hosted here:Corvair College #22 KGTU Texas Spring Break 2012

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Above, Kevin Purtee, host of CC#22 and #28, awarded the Cherry Grove trophy 2012, getting in his Pietenpol. Kevin’s day job is flying AH-64 Apaches for the Texas Air Guard.

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GuestEditorial, Arnold Holmes On Affordable Aircraft…“the failure in our success is really that we progressively featured only the very best award winners and show planes in the magazine. I think that over the years this has cultivated a common ideology that if you did not build an award winner than you are not worthy of building anything. People have come to believe
that the requirements for success are so high that the ideology itself is defeating.”

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To read about the Colleges Arnold hosted click here: http://www.flycorvair.com/cc17.html and get a look at this one also:Corvair College #25, In Photos

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Above, Arnold Holmes and his son Cody at our booth, Oshkosh 2010. Arnold is a renaissance man of General Aviation and Home building. He has been a good friend for nearly 20 years.

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Guest writer: Phil Maxson, flying a 3100cc Corvair in his 601XL “On Saturday, I had one of my most enjoyable days flying I’ve had in very long time. It was the first flight in my plane using a
new engine. I now have a 3100 Big Boy temporarily installed.”

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To learn about our Zenvair discussion group click on this:‘Zenvair’ Information board formed       and:‘Zenvair’ information board, part #2. To Learn about the Trophy, read:The Cherry Grove Trophy.

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Above, Phil Maxson of NJ with his Corvair powered 601 XL that has been flying since 2006.

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Corvair Powered Merlin Flying Over Newfoundland “I follow the weather closely to get every bit of flying I possibly can. Even a 15 minute flight before dark after work provides me with a fix. I usually don’t go very far; but I don’t have to be in the middle of uninhabited wilderness.  Low and slow over barrens, lakes, rocks, and trees. When the weather is good, it is beautiful here.”

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To see more pictures of Newfoundland in winter, read: Floats on Snow, Corvair powered Merlin

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 Above, Jeff Moores, at the controls of his Corvair Powered Merlin on full lotus floats, in Newfoundland, Canada.

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Guest Editorial, Pietenpol builder Terry Hand.  “I had an Instructor in NAS Pensacola teach me early on when he said, “Read and heed those warnings. Most of them are written in blood.” What he meant was most of those warnings were added after some pilot had done something wrong in operating the aircraft that either damaged the aircraft, injured or killed someone, or had done both.”

Above, Terry Hand with his steel tube Pietenpol at CC#24. He flies B-767s today, but has long instructed in aircraft from Helicopters to 757s and 767s. He has a tremendous range of skills, but a very humble approach. 

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Guest Editorial, Greg Crouchley, Waiex/Corvair builder. “So, where to start? Totally unfamiliar with Corvairs,  I was skeptical of your statement that cores are plentiful and everywhere and to look on Craig’s List. Did it, and a week later I found myself in Alexandria, Va under a Monza
helping a car enthusiast pull the motor. “

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To read about Greg’s running motor click on this story: World’s Strongest 3,000cc Corvair, built by Greg Crouchley.

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Waiex/3,000cc Corvair builder Greg Crouchley, above, demonstrates that you can put a Corvair into a Porsche. He is now working on a Corvair powered Zenith 750.

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Oscar Zuniga – Guest perspective “I learned a lot about life and about frugality and practicality from what my parents and grandparents taught me and from how they lived, but I learned even
more about those things from my own growing-up years.  I’m the second eldest of 10 children”

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Above, Oscar Zuniga and myself at the 2003 Texas college. The photo is more than 10 years old,  but the memories of time well spent never fade.-ww